Tuesdays with Ana: On learning how to make bread

Welcome to the second Tuesdays with Ana of 2014! 2014, phew. It’s still hard to believe this is reality. Wasn’t Y2K just a year or two ago?

Did everyone have a good new year’s celebration? Here at Governing Ana, we’ll have a Lunar New Year celebration (often erroneously called “Chinese New Year” even though far more countries than China celebrate the new year according to the lunar calendar) on January 30, January 31, and February 1. January 31 is the official date of the lunar new year, but often the tradition is to celebrate the day after and before as well. We’ll have a special guest post about the Lunar New Year in Malaysia, and we’ll also have a visit from Mira and Hana describing their celebration in South Korea. They have, shall we say, a somewhat kinky twist to a traditional new year’s game. πŸ˜€

Due to some difficulties with the cover art, Mira’s Miracle has been rescheduled for release this Friday, January 10! I’ll have a special sneak peek for you as part of Saturday Spankings, and we’ll get to hear from the wonderful Maren Smith who created the Castle world where Hana and Mira visit. It’s been a wonderful journey to write the “happily ever after” for Mira, although of course she has to conquer her fears from Desire in Any Language. Please check back later this week for more behind-the-scenes fun, including some outtakes from the creation of Mira’s Miracle. πŸ˜€

As for today’s Tuesdays with Ana topic, I have recently learned to make bread. Not banana bread or other quick breads that I learned how to make in childhood, but honest-to-goodness real bread with yeast and kneading. I grew up in an area and era filled with bakeries and, if you were ambitious, bread-making machines. I don’t believe my mother ever made bread (unless it was decades ago), and I’m not even sure if my grandmother did. For sure, my grandmother never made bread when I was old enough to remember.

So for me, when a friend came to visit last spring, I couldn’t wait to watch the magic of bread making. She entered armed with flour, oil, and yeast (as if I don’t stock oil or flour…sheesh! πŸ™‚ ), and we got to work. Except bread making is an art rather than a science, so after she left I enjoyed the fresh bread but didn’t feel confident about using the leftover yeast (which is still in my fridge as I type this post). I loved pounding the dough, and kneading the mixture took both strength and effort. I couldn’t believe that a few ingredients and less than two hours could result in chewy, dense, homemade bread unlike anything found in grocery stores.

Since then my friend has encouraged me to make bread on my own, but perfectionist Ana doesn’t do well with trial and error. What if I had to throw out a failure? What if I wasted half a bag of flour, plus created all that mess for nothing?

When I cook meals, very rarely do I actually cook a failure. Baking, however, is finicky. Margarine instead of butter, or ungreased pan versus greased, or the wrong kind of flour can result in an unsightly, disgusting mess. I tried to make salt-free banana bread with yeast last week, and I was annoyed all day after I had to throw out the half-cooked lump.

Last week, however, I screwed up my courage and plunged my hands into a bowlful of flour, oil, water, yeast, sugar, and salt. I kneaded and squeezed and pounded and twisted, and I let the dough rise. Half an hour later, two perfect loaves of braided bread dough greeted me. Mm! After dusting the dough with an egg wash and different kinds of seasoning, I got to take out my very first two loaves of bread made by my very own hands. Without any help, coaching, or advice, either. πŸ™‚

Slicing that first crust and spreading the bread with fresh salted butter…mmm! I dislike most of the factory-made bread (too little flavor and weird texture), and I have yet to find a good bakery that stocks bread I like. I still prefer whole wheat bread to white, but I’ll take homemade white bread over bakery whole wheat bread any day. No icky chemicals, no disgusting preservatives, no ingredients I can’t pronounce…just wholesome, filling, yummy goodness of bread straight from the oven to my table. Next time, I’ll try adding a bit of whole wheat flour to see if the bread still turns out all right.

I’ve always been more of a baker than a cook (sweets, desserts, cookies, candy), so being able to cook regular-meal food has been a pleasant surprise. Homemade bread is not that much more work than quick bread, and it’s a lot healthier than eating cake disguised as bread. πŸ˜€

For me, I find bread making meditative, contemplative, and centering. Some people pray by remaining silent and still, but I’ve never been able to do that. I fidget, my mind wanders, and I start imagining other scenarios instead of focusing. But if I work on a repetitive task like kneading bread or baking, I find myself refreshed, stabilized, and better prepared to deal with life’s dramas.

How about you? Have you ever made bread? Do you have favorite recipes? If you’ve never made bread, would you like to learn? Do you have any secret bread making tips?

What do you find helps you with everyday stress? What is your “bread making” relaxation?

 

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79 thoughts on “Tuesdays with Ana: On learning how to make bread

  1. abby says:

    I have made bread, although not recently. Good for you for giving it a try and being successful. I agree there is nothing like the rolling, kneading, and shaping to get one in a relaxed, contemplative mood. Stress relief….well a spanking sure helps….or sitting with a good book and a cup of tea…or some face time with the grands!
    hugs abby

    Like

  2. Missy says:

    Hey Ana πŸ™‚

    I read the topic of your post and came straight away πŸ™‚ ok I make bread, I love to make bread, but I’m a cheat, yes I use the bread maker, well I did for years, until I started a little “out of home venture” and was introduced to the world of home made breads, with really easy recipes, and completely fool proof, for someone like me. See I love to cook, cooking fresh for my family is something I enjoy doing, I cook lots of different types of food, and having travelled quite a bit, I have collected many exotic recipes too. To serve fresh bread has always been a special thing for me. Now with the new skills I have learnt, home made soups and fresh warm bread has become a favourite round here. Ramble on πŸ™‚ anyway if you want ill send you a couple recipes πŸ™‚

    My relaxation is reading a good book. If I ever get a chance and find some quite time, that’s what I do, losing myself in a good book is my ideal heaven πŸ™‚

    Hugs x

    Like

    • Anastasia Vitsky says:

      Yes, please!! Do you have a recipe for a good whole wheat homemade bread? I’m always looking for soup recipes, too, as long as they don’t contain beans. Not a bean fan. πŸ˜€

      I had no idea bread making was so easy, but I will be sure to make my own from now on. I don’t see any reason to buy bread after this.

      Yum, a good book plus hot soup and homemade fresh bread…sounds heavenly!

      Like

      • Missy says:

        Oh I actually do, it’s a German “dinkle” wheat bread or one with oats if you like that kind of stuff πŸ™‚ ill email the recipe as soon as I translate it for you, or do you speak German maybe ??

        Also a lot of the soups I make have beans, shame you don’t like it, I have this conversation a lot with my kids lol

        Give me a couple of days and ill email you x

        Like

  3. DelFonte says:

    My breadmaking skills rely on a breadmaker, even then it can still go horribly wrong. Fresh yeast is key. Even if it hasn’t past its sell by date, it ages and loses potency. The smell of fresh bread is delicious. I always grew up in villages with bakeries. If you weren’t there before midday, the bread was all gone. The baker would leave the ‘failed’ loaves outside his shop alongside burnt offerings. These we would take and feed to the ducks in the village pond. So even bakers don’t get it right!
    hugs
    DF

    Like

    • Anastasia Vitsky says:

      Breadmaker as in a machine? If I had to make a lot of loaves at once, I’d be tempted to use an electronic kneader. One or two loaves every week or every other week won’t be a problem, though. πŸ™‚

      Yummy, failed loaves. I bet they were as delicious as the broken cookies. Mm, now I’m hungry!

      Like

  4. Mona LIsa says:

    Yes, I have baked bread many times. When the boys were small so we just ate home baked bread .. You’re right, it’s so much tastier …

    If I have some cooked potatoes left in the fridge, so I tear them nicely into the dough. Then the dough is so much finer and does not dry out as fast.
    Baking your own bread is common, here in Sweden. Even children learn to bake bread at school on “home knowledge hours”.

    Baking at all was always a relaxation for me. Then we moved to our current house and the kitchen has incredible “anti baking energy”. I do not know why …
    Relax for me is an good book, listen to a nice music, nice bath with candle light and back caress … by Leo .. lol ..

    Like

    • Anastasia Vitsky says:

      I have sometimes put grated potato into a quick bread, so I can see it working in regular bread. Baking bread is a wonderful way to have fresh, healthy food at home. I wish I could find an easy gluten-free alternative for my friend who can’t have wheat. Does anyone have a good resource?

      Good book, nice music, and a bath all sound wonderful. πŸ™‚

      Like

  5. angieia says:

    I make homemade bread or biscuits for the holidays. I have been making it for years and just realized that my recipe was wrong. I went with what my mother-in-law said was in a package of yeast instead of reading the jar that I use. I was putting to much yeast in. The bread always seemed to taste yeasty now I know why.
    I haven’t tried making braided bread or anything very fancy for fear of messing up.

    Like

    • Anastasia Vitsky says:

      Oh, braided bread is easy! In some ways, I think it’s easier than regular bread because it holds its shape better (so if it’s a bit crumbly it doesn’t matter as much). Plus, it looks SO pretty.

      I’ve never made yeast rolls, but I’d love to try. I’d also love to try your recipe if you don’t mind sharing. πŸ™‚

      Like

      • nancygoldberglevine says:

        My husband got us a bread machine when they first came out and I loved experimenting, but the round shape didn’t make it look like a real loaf of bread–the house smelled so good. I still loved it. I’d love to bake my own bread–my relaxation is also reading or listening to music. A book takes you away from your problems for a while.

        Like

        • Anastasia Vitsky says:

          I remember when bread machines first came out. My family never had one (we used the local bakery instead), and I thought they were too expensive. Especially since the first ones used mixes, I think, instead of ordinary ingredients.

          I wish you lived nearby so I could drop off a loaf! I can foresee many extra loaves in my future while I experiment, far more than my family can eat. πŸ™‚

          Like

      • angieia says:

        Hi Ana,

        I will get you the recipe. It is my husband’s grandmother’s recipe. It takes awhile to make, but that’s because once you do something you have to wait two hours for the dough to rise.

        Like

        • Anastasia Vitsky says:

          Oh, thank you! I will look forward to trying it. The recipe I use only requires half an hour of rising. I was going to try bagels, but the recipe my friend sent me takes 4 hours (with 2 of those from rising) and 12 cups of flour. Phew!

          Do you let your dough rise in the oven?

          Like

          • angieia says:

            Grandma Mabel’s Bread

            2 pkg yeast (1/4 oz. packages or 2 1/4 t. yeast equals one pkg.)
            1 cup lukewarm water
            1 t. sugar
            Dissolve above in a very large bowl.
            Add:
            5 cups flour
            5 or 6 cups lukewarm water
            Mix together well (I use a whisk to get it mixed together good.)
            *Let set until light and bubbly – approximately 2 hours.
            In separate bowl, mix
            1/2 cup sugar
            3 t. salt
            7 T. melted Crisco.
            Add to sponge.
            Then add approximately 10 cups flour by feel – knead once or twice, grease bowl – let raise 2 hours. Then make bread into biscuits (I use a knife to slice off a handful of dough, then knead it into a round ball) – Grease pans (I use 9 x 13 pans or you can also you a loaf pan) – Let biscuits raise 2 hours. Bake at 350 degrees till done 25-30 minutes. Flip out of pans when done onto a towel to cool. I rub the tops with butter so they don’t get to hard. We slice into slices and put butter or jelly on them.

            This does take awhile, but you are able to get stuff done in between when it is rising.
            My mother-in-law told me one 1/4 oz. yeast package was a tablespoon, so my biscuits always tasted really yeasty.

            Good luck!!

            Like

  6. Ami says:

    You hussy! I now have to gallop off and make some bread myself because I am lusting after it so much! There is nothing, absolutely nothing, like real homemade bread! (Even if I do have a tendency to cheat and let the breadmaker do the initial pounding!) I then like to pound the dough myself and let it rise at least twice more.

    If you like making plaited loaves, have you made a traditional Challah? (Jewish egg bread) Or Polish rye bread with caraway seeds? As you know, my favourite breads at the moment are Italian – Focaccia and Ciabatta made with extra virgin olive oil.

    I so wish I were there kneading away with you! What fun! And here I am having to lose at least 15 pounds before June for a wedding we are going to!

    Many hugs
    Ami

    Like

    • Anastasia Vitsky says:

      Ami, I think that using very warm water helps with the kneading. I don’t know if the air was humid or something, but in my latest effort the dough barely needed any kneading. I haven’t punched down risen dough to knead again, though. I wonder if that’s only for some kinds of dough?

      I have never made challah…would love to! Do you have a recipe?

      I am not a fan of Italian bread as I prefer a bit more texture, but I do like Ciabatta and Focacia. No recipes for those yet, though. Yum.

      Like

  7. minellesbreath says:

    The braiding must give the bread a lovely texture. I love homemade bread toasted. Nothing is better. There is a comfort to making and eating bread made with your very own hands. Maybe it has something to do with being able to provide food with very little ingredients!
    You are very creative my dear. Maybe you can share how to add other ingredients to the bread changing the simple white bread…..Cheese…chives….???

    Like

    • Anastasia Vitsky says:

      I had no idea that homemade bread made good toast. Darn, I forgot to toast my last few slices! Well, I’ll probably make some more bread today. Do you toast day-old bread or fresh, too?

      I can’t believe bread can be made with so few ingredients, either. This time I won’t knead so much, though. I like when the bread is dense and chewy.

      I did sprinkle a bit of cheese on top of the bread this time, but I think I used too many basil leaves. The top of the loaf had a slightly bitter texture. But chives…that’s a great idea! Will have to give it a try.

      Like

  8. Leigh Smith says:

    Years ago, when i used to try to make everything from scratch, I used to make baguettes. No bread machines (at least not home versions) back then. It was time consuming but there is nothing like a piece of warm bread straight out of the oven. Yum.
    Can you save me a slice of yours.

    Like

    • Anastasia Vitsky says:

      I think I ended up making a sort of braided baguette this time because I stretched the dough so thin. πŸ˜€ How did you make yours? And yes, warm bread fresh from the oven. YUM. Think I need to go bake now..

      And stop by! Would love the company.

      Like

  9. quiet sara says:

    I am quite terrible at making bread but I do make pizza dough from scratch and my family seems to like it. Glad you enjoyed your experience. My mom used to make it and I agree the toasted homemade bread is the best thing ever. You will have to try that next time. πŸ™‚

    Like

    • Anastasia Vitsky says:

      Yum, pizza dough! I was looking up recipes the other day and thinking I’d like to give it a try. Only I don’t have a pizza stone, so I’m not sure it would turn out. How do you bake yours? And what do you use for toppings/sauce?

      Like

      • quiet sara says:

        I bake mine on a flat cookie sheet. I put it in the oven 10 minutes and then take it
        out and add red sauce from a jar like prego or ragu, or white sauce which I make from scratch with heavy cream, parmisan, asiago, etc… garlic, or I sometimes do a ranch pizza using Marzetti’s ranch, then I top with Motzerella cheese. If we add meat it is usually sausage or pepperoni. Often we only add onions and mushrooms. I have heard if you bake it on parchment on the cookie sheet that makes the crust nice and
        crispy. Also, using a stone is supposed to be the best way. I saw them recently at Old Time Pottery for less than $10. I need to get one!

        Like

        • quiet sara says:

          Oh, forgot to add, I put it back in the oven after I take it out to put the toppings on. I cook it another 15 minutes or so until done. My family loves it.

          Like

          • Anastasia Vitsky says:

            Really, not even $10?? I had no idea! Baking stones used to be incredibly expensive. I might have to do some investigating. Yum, yours sounds delicious. We really will have to do another recipe exchange soon. πŸ™‚

            Like

            • Leah says:

              Totally worth the money. We got one as a gift and use it all the time, but my husband does the pizzas. He freezes it first and then puts it directly on the oven rack. I love pizza dinner parties b/c the men all end up in the kitchen doing all the work.

              Like

              • Anastasia Vitsky says:

                I just looked at my grocery store, and there was a 3-stone set for $12! Wow, I had no idea. I wasn’t ready to get it today, but I’ll keep it in mind for later.

                Does your husband freeze only the dough or the entire made pizza? And yum, it sounds wonderful to have pizza made for you.

                Like

                • Leah says:

                  Just the dough. If you’re using sticky dough, put corn meal between the stone and the dough. Also, season your stone once you get it – it won’t look as pretty but makes cleanup effortless.

                  Yes, pizza and sex are not mutually exclusive. Sex is extra nice for men who just made dinner.

                  Like

  10. terpsichore says:

    Oooo yum! homemade fresh baked bread right out of the oven! I have not ventured to make bread though I love to bake and used to help my mom who used to bake fresh bread all the time when I was growing up. I have fond memories from childhood of helping knead dough and of eating bread, rolls, English muffins hot out of the oven. I would love to learn how. My mom and I have talked about having a bread making date but her hands have been bothering her…so maybe she can mix and I can knead. πŸ™‚ I would love any simple recipes you discover – we tend to eat wheat bread here…so if you find a good recipe and don’t mind sharing…also, someone above mentioned homemade soup – which sounds so good right now in this cold weather. πŸ™‚ Happy baking

    Like

    • Anastasia Vitsky says:

      Making bread is not as difficult as I thought it would be! I hear that wheat bread is a lot harder, but I’m ready for a challenge. It’s disappointing when I have to throw out a failure, but it’s fun to learn. I like playing with the dough and shaping it into different forms. I’ve never found an English muffin recipe, but that would be fun.

      Maybe we can have another recipe exchange. πŸ™‚ I’ll noodle a bit here, and I also have a good stew recipe that works both on the stove and in a crock pot–minimal work, too. I cheat and use soup stock and/or prepared gravy, but everything else is fresh ingredients. We’ll have to all share recipes soon. πŸ˜€ Have you used your Advent Calendar recipe book yet? I haven’t, but I can’t wait to try some.

      Like

      • terpsichore says:

        another recipe exchange sounds like a great idea…love sharing recipes with friends…those often become my favorites. I made the snowball cookies, the Austrian Linzer tarts, and the spiced cider over the holidays -fun…many more I would like to try – your caramel being one of them – but need to stay away from baking with lots of sugar for a bit – I have quite the sweet tooth, am addicted to sugar, and have no will power…so am baking “healthier” treats at the moment to recover from overindulging the last month… πŸ™‚

        Like

        • Anastasia Vitsky says:

          Sadly, that’s true for many of us. 😦 Oh well, bread is healthy…right? πŸ˜€

          I haven’t even begun trying the wonderful recipes, but I’m looking forward to it. Yum. Now I’m hungry!

          Oh, and the caramel is so rich that you will only want a small piece at a time, if that helps. πŸ™‚

          Like

  11. laurellasky says:

    I can cook ok but to release stress I play tennis and on days I don’t play I go to our fitness center and work out for 40 minutes. I am extremely overweight and in pain but after the tennis or workout I get a high. Must be those endomors that kick in.

    Like

    • Anastasia Vitsky says:

      Hooray!! It is not easy to exercise regularly for anyone, but it sounds like you are dedicated. Can you give some of your dedication to me? πŸ˜€ I really need it! I hope you stay healthy and don’t get injured because of the pain.

      Like

  12. Leah says:

    I love homemade bread! It’s amazing how easy it is if you allow time to rise, etc. I love homemade rolls. I always make a bunch and plan to throw them in the freezer but they don’t last long.

    Like

  13. Joelle Casteel says:

    I was making our family’s bread from scratch for awhile, tried multiple recipes- the problem was my Master’s pickiness. Everything I tried, He judged as “too chewy.” But then He prefers the bland non-taste of something like Wonder- ew ew gag! lol I’d like to return to making homemade bread for at least me

    Like

    • Anastasia Vitsky says:

      Let’s see…2 packages of yeast mixed in 2 cups of very warm water (I bring it to boiling and let it cool off for about 5 minutes), 2 tablespoons of sugar, 2 tablespoons of oil (I use olive oil), 2 teaspoons of salt (or to taste), and 6 cups of flour. About 1/2 cup less if you use whole wheat flour. I’m experimenting with mixtures at the moment. πŸ™‚ Knead, let rise in a warm spot for 30 minutes, and then bake for 30 minutes at 350. Voila! πŸ˜€

      Like

      • Michael says:

        Thanks for the recipe, Ana. Season does most of the cooking in our house as it is one of her passions, but I have a few dishes I prepare. I wonder if that is why Season has Poison Control at the top of her speed dial. ❓

        Like

  14. SassyTwatter says:

    I read this post early this morning….but got distracted but came back to read all the comments.

    Nothing than fresh bread. That’s why I love traveling to Europe all the little bakeries to pop into. Also nothing better than coming back from a late night out and you come across a bakery that has just put out there fresh warm bread heaven!!

    Bet seriously you little tease share the recipe and what you made to go with it.

    When I lived in Sweden where bread is a staple we would make bread every other day. Was a. Perfect snack in cold winter day warm bread w a smudge of butter some cheese and cucumber making myself hungry. I used to bake all the time cakes cream brΓ»lΓ©e cookies ice cream but everyone here said I was making them chubby. I turn to yoga or reading as a way to distress although reading can get you in trouble and be day can be gone and nothing done.

    Like

    • Anastasia Vitsky says:

      Yum, stop by my house sometime if you want fresh bread. I cook and feed people for compliments. πŸ˜€

      I did share the recipe, miss naughty lady who isn’t on speaking terms with morning. πŸ˜€

      Every other day? Yum!! That must have been great. I like real butter on homemade bread. On bakery/grocery store bread I don’t mind margarine spread, but for real bread I want real butter. πŸ™‚

      Yes, I bet naughty you does get in trouble reading!!

      Like

      • sassytwatter says:

        Always real butter but freash bread from the oven doesn’t even need butter. Ok you are making me hungry again.

        I’m going to have to pop over sometime soon if you promise to make candy too!

        Um ya know your books are on my kindle which I dare not share w anybody really they need to make a private password section so people don’t think yiur so shady when you flatly refuse to show them what’s on yiur kindle

        Like

  15. sarah123 says:

    Hi Anna I can’t make bread and the sad part is my fav is banana bread and I only get it once a year from my sister in law at Christmas I have tried to find a good place to buy it no luck

    Like

    • Anastasia Vitsky says:

      Sarah, I used to think the same thing! Quick bread is super easy. I don’t think commercially made banana bread is worth the money. The trick to making good banana bread is not to skimp on bananas. Too many people only put in one banana for a loaf, and that’s not enough to get a good taste.

      Quick bread is faster to prepare and put into the oven (mashing the bananas takes the longest) than homemade bread with yeast, but homemade bread with yeast takes very few ingredients. I was very surprised that it was easier than I’d thought. I bet you could do it if you tried. πŸ™‚ We could do a cooking class sometime.

      Like

  16. catrouble says:

    Hey Ana…I used to make homemade bread all the time when the boys were home. They also loved the mini loaves I sometimes made. The mini loaves are great for snacking with cheese and/or salami. They are also easier to keep fresh if you don’t want to eat a whole loaf at once!

    Am having internet issues…as soon as I fix them, (have to run for new part tomorrow 😦 ) I have a wonderful recipe for honey wheat bread which I will send to you…might publish also…who knows. πŸ˜€

    Hugs and Blessings…
    Cat

    Like

  17. Terry says:

    Hi Ana
    There are somethings in life that just make you feel good. The smell of fresh baked bread, fresh ground coffee and anything baked with cinnamon are heaven for me. I have both baked bread from scratch and used a bread making machine but not for many years. My husband has to stay on a strict diet because of health concerns and to most of my family carbohydrate has become a dirty word. If I really want fresh bread, I am lucky enough to have some great bakeries nearby to get my fix. I’m glad you’re having fun with your new found baking skills.

    Are far as relaxation goes, I agree with several people here who said reading. If I have a good book, I can disappear for hours. I read The Lord of the Rings trilogy over a weekend when I was in college and had a break in my studies. I usually don’t have that kind of free time now but I can still do “power reading” if give a chance.

    Like

    • Anastasia Vitsky says:

      It’s too bad that carbohydrates have gotten such a bad rap. There used to be a time when eating bread was a normal part of a healthy meal. I wish we could enjoy good bread instead of fretting about its nutrition. Yum, nice bakeries nearby? I am jealous.

      My problem with reading fast is that it becomes expensive. 😦 Then I hoard my books and don’t read them…weird but true. Power reading…great term!

      Like

      • Terry says:

        I know what you mean about books getting expensive. Growing up I would haunt my local library and they are still great places to get regular books to read. The library where I live now has a program where you can temporarily download an e-book to your Nook or Kindle for a few weeks. After the check out time passes the e-book disappears so someone else can e-borrow it. If you really love the book you can always buy it.

        There is a free site I like called bookbub.com for e-books. You sign up and pick the genre of books you like (mysteries, science fiction etc) and then everyday they send you a list of books that are either free or up to a max of $2.99. The books are purchased usually through Amazon or Barnes & Noble. If you don’t like any of the books you just delete the e-mail. I have over 100 books on my Kindle app that either were free or 99 cents. I’m not sure if the site works outside of the US but you can check it out.

        Like

        • Anastasia Vitsky says:

          I love the ebook checkout program at my library, but I always forget to register my device. I will have to do that.

          I have heard of Bookbub but did not realize it had free books. Good deal! I will check it out. πŸ™‚

          Like

  18. Roz says:

    Congrats on your bead making success Ana πŸ™‚ I have yet to try making bread myself, but I agree, there is nothing like homemade bread. Yum!

    Crazy as this may sound. I can find mowing the lawn relaxing. Sure, it takes effort and it is work but it’s a good stress reliever plus being a rather mindless task, it’s also good thinking, processing and general ‘brain dump’ time.

    Looking forward to the Lunar New Year celebration and hearing more from Mira and Hana!

    Hugs,
    Roz

    Like

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