Ana’s Advent Calendar 2014, Day 2: #GivingTuesday

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First, an order of business. Renee, as the very first commenter on the very first post of Ana’s Advent Calendar 2014, you win a commemorative holiday card donated in honor of Lambda Legal. The card has the logo of the Advent Calendar and will be signed by yours truly. (The donor of the holiday cards has also contributed a $100 gift certificate of the winner’s choice as a grand prize.) There are 24 cards available for prizes this year, and Renee wins the first one! Please email me your mailing address, and I’ll get it in the mail for you.

Lambda Legal is a non-profit organization that works for LGBT legal and policy justice, which is fitting considering today’s topic: Giving Tuesday.

Last year, the Giving Tuesday post and discussion brought tears to many. Take a look, especially at the comments. In response to the commercialism of Black Friday and Cyber Monday, an international movement formed called Giving Tuesday.

Last December, I told the story of “Annie” who never forgot a stranger bringing food to her family when she was a child. I listed ways for people to get involved, but something curious happened.

Almost a year later as I prepared for a conference in Atlanta, something tugged at the back of my head. Wasn’t there a LGBT shelter in Atlanta? I went back to the post to check. Yes! Lost-N-Found Youth serves homeless LGBT young adults. While I had always been a supporter of Invisible People TV and their work on homelessness, I hadn’t thought about specific ministries for LGBT homeless. Did you know that approximately 40% of homeless youth are LGBT?

That shocked me. Here’s a quick video from a 48-hour vigil in which the director of LNF spends time on the streets. (Fair warning: there is one swear word.)

I called LNF a few days before my trip to obtain promotional brochures and cards to distribute at the conference. I set up my book-signing table (wooden spoon signing, actually) with a tip jar to collect donations for LNF.

Spoon fan

At the end of the evening, I had collected $13. Yes. Thirteen dollars. I added a little bit, but I felt embarrassed. All of that time and effort, and I couldn’t give LNF enough money to buy more than a few cups of coffee.

Then what happened?

Ana had an idea. (Ana has a dozen ideas a day.)”What if we got 69 authors together to each donate a dollar, and we put our LGBT books onto a basic black and white Kindle to donate to LNF?”I asked this question on my Facebook, and the response staggered me. In just over three weeks, approximately 45 authors, readers, publishers, editors, and book reviewers raised just under $3,000 to purchase 26 Kindles and accessories. I received inquiries and offers from all around the world. Authors and publishers donated close to 300 LGBT books (and a few non-LGBT), and I became best friends with the Amazon technical support team. 10801894_10205221680891893_6939112909235295421_n

This is the first shipment of Kindles. When the next shipment of 8 Kindles arrives next week, 2 will be sent to Trinity Place Shelter in New York City. The rest will be held for later distribution. They were purchased early due to–wait for it–Black Friday sales of 20% off. Best Black Friday of my life.

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These 18 Kindles will be delivered to LNF for use in their youth center, their current 6-bed residence, and their expanded 18-bed shelter in the spring. When, you ask?Oh, this week. On Friday, to be precise. 😀 I’ll get to meet the staff at LNF and some of the youth, and I’ll train them on how to use the Kindles.It’s been hundreds of hours of work and extraordinary generosity from the publishers, authors, and readers involved. Can you imagine transferring up to 300 books to 26 Kindles? Phew! That’s why you haven’t seen much of me lately. 🙂 I’m still not quite finished, but it’s close.

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You’ll get to meet Rick Westbrook, the director of LNF, at an interview (right here for Advent Calendar). Later in the month, you’ll also hear from Trinity Place Shelter and Lucie’s Place, two other organizations serving LGBT homeless youth. And, of course, I’ll tell you about my trip to LNF once I return.

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Today, I’d like to do two things.

  1. If you and/or your organization has contributed to Something Good, please stand up and be recognized. Don’t be shy! It’s not showing off or calling attention to yourself; it’s showing support and the remarkable breadth of this grassroots effort.
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  2. What causes are you passionate about supporting? Please include a brief description and link to the site. (Only one link per comment, or WordPress flags your comment as spam. If you want to post multiple links, reply in separate comments for each one.)

    Or, what ideas do you have for making a difference? Especially if we don’t have a lot of money (and most of us don’t), how can we help out?

If you didn’t get a chance already, check out the responses to yesterday’s post. Meet your fellow miscreants. 😀

As always, please make an effort today to respond to each other’s comments. Do you see a cause you’re interested in, or did you get a new idea you want to try? Let the person know! Do you see someone new? Say hello!

Remember, you have until midnight EST for your comment to count as an entry toward Perfect Attender awards. However, you can still comment late to join the discussion.

Happy Giving Tuesday!

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Something Good press release (blog address: https://good4lgbt.wordpress.com/)

Something Good is an informal coalition of authors, readers, publishers, and editors that provides homeless LGBT youth with Kindles and ebooks free of charge. Our mission statement reads:

 

This group is dedicated to providing Kindles and LGBT ebooks for Lost-N-Found Youth, a non-profit in Atlanta, Georgia that helps homeless LGBT youth.

Our goal is to connect kids with books that show them, “It’s okay to be me.” Some of us never had that for our generation, and we want to provide that for the upcoming generation.

We will provide the shelter with Kindles that the residents can use to read, develop literacy, and find stories to give visions of a better life. We want to give each resident a personal library to fill his or her head with good thoughts instead of negative ones.

 

Rather than handouts, we wish to provide incentives and positive reinforcement for youth who are committed to changing their lives. For that reason, the Kindles will be used in one of three ways:

 

  • Two to three Kindles will be placed in the drop-in center for youth to sign out on a temporary basis. This will provide reading material for the widest audience.
  • Six Kindles will be given to the current residents of the live-in center for use during their stay. If they complete the ninety-day program successfully, the Kindle will be theirs to keep.
  • Additional Kindles will be available for use by other program registrants. When the shelter expands to an eighteen-bed capacity in March, additional Kindles will fill the need and replace those given to graduating residents.

 

Lost-N-Found Youth will receive the Kindles and deliver them to youth most likely to make good use of them. The youth will be able to opt in to a mailing list that will deliver LGBT books on a regular basis. These books would include young adult, new adult, and non-erotic adult LGBT fiction and non-fiction. Goals include:

 

  • Engage kids in positive activities. We want kids off drugs and hooked on books.
  • Reinforce self-worth and affirm identity as LGBT youth.
  • Promote literacy and open the door for education.
  • Provide access to technology that will increase marketability for employment.

 

 

To donate money toward Kindles, mobi files of books, or in-kind support, please contact Anastasia Vitsky at ana_stasia2007@yahoo.com with the subject line “Something Good donation.” @AnastasiaVitsky on Twitter. Thank you!

 

 

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128 thoughts on “Ana’s Advent Calendar 2014, Day 2: #GivingTuesday

  1. Tina S. says:

    Congrats Renee!
    I did make a donation to something good
    tubiefriends.com
    this is an organization started by a group of mom’s whose children have been or currently using a feeding tube as a primary source of nutrition. They’ve seen what a comfort a tubie friend can be during a hospital stay, procedure, or just when they need a friend. These tubie friends can also be used as a teaching tool for family, friends, or caregivers. The goal is to take the fear out of feeding tubes, one tubie friend at a time.
    I made my son’s tubie friend, and also one for our friend who also has cystic fibrosis and recently had a tube placed. It has brought much comfort to them.

    Like

  2. Tracey Gee says:

    I have two charities (and my office supports them as well). Our American charity of choice is The Rebecca Foundation (donating cloth diapers to families in need). http://www.clothforall.com/. The Canadian charity is the Canadian Heart & Stroke Foundation. When I started freelancing for this office, they asked for charity suggestions from all the employees. They match any of our donations PLUS make ones on their own. The ones they match for us, we get the receipts. Not that it’s just about receipts, but I mention that because they don’t do it JUST for their corporate receipt. There are so many people in need. I insist each year that anyone tempted to buy me presents donate to a charity instead. I love gifts, but I love sharing more.

    Like

    • Anastasia Vitsky says:

      How great! I wish that more companies would match donations this way. Someday I’ll be filthy rich and able to own a company that does that. Oh, who am I kidding? 😀

      I think the biggest issue with donations/making a difference is that people think it’s all about money. It’s not. Networking, publicizing, and helping behind the scenes can be needed just as much.

      Like

  3. Mary M. says:

    We contribute to many local groups, especially the local food pantry and the Hope Center, which is dedicated to preventing homelessness, which is especially critical here in WI in the winter. Their site is http://www.hopecenterwi.org. No one is ever turned away, especially families and teens who can have problems finding a safe space. I also never pass a red kettle without donating if I can. My work also matches donations.

    Like

  4. abby says:

    Great post…thanks Ana…and thanks for all you are doing for those who need it….I mostly give my gift of time, I help cook and deliver meals to a soup kitchen once a month and work at a ‘clothes closet’ once a month also. I also help out at a local food pantry with donations and time. At this time of year i adopt a family…and help out with food and presents…
    I have been very blessed in many ways….it is my; way of saying thanks.
    hugs abby

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    • Mary M. says:

      I totally agree, my family has always adopted a Christmas family or shopped for people from the Angel Tree. My daughter has always had as much fun doing the shopping or wrapping for those folks as opening her own presents. My husband recently substituted for the regular cook at the Salvation Army Shelter and loved it. Donating time in a busy world is very important.

      Like

      • Tina S. says:

        We always pick from the giving trees at the store. I key my 3 children pick out a child their age and shop for them. It’s such a special time to teach about giving.

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      • Tina S. says:

        We always pick from the giving trees at the store. I let my 3 children pick out a child their age and shop for them. It’s such a special time to teach about giving.

        Like

  5. Jay says:

    Hey there… day 2 already?? I hope I can keep up with everything!

    I have donated to LNF, I couldn’t donate money but I was able to give 18 sets of headphones that I make for my business Vagabondia Creations… find us on facebook and Etsy or just ask me and I can send you the link… I would post it here but would rather use my one link for the charity that I am passionate about!

    While LGBT causes are very important to me I would have to say that animal shelters are more important and are sometimes forgotten especially this time of year when everyone is trying to scramble around for all the worthy causes out there… Please take a minute to check this page out and if you can help that would be great or at least take some time and look for a shelter in your area to help out!

    Thanks for your time and consideration
    https://www.facebook.com/luckypawsanimalrescue/timeline

    Like

  6. Holla Dean says:

    Ana, it’s a wonderful thing you’ve done with Something Good! I donate to mental health organizations. I have a son who is bi-polar/schizophrenic and it is another segment of the population that people react to with embarrassment and shame. My favorite here in the Phoenix area is Toby House. Their website is http://www.tobyhouse.com and for some reason their link is broken this morning. My son was there for a year when he was 18 years old. I have never seen a more caring staff deal with the mentally ill. My son will be 45 next month and is currently living on his own. Part of that is due to Toby House. Their services have been expanded to more than a dozen residential homes and now have day treatment facilities and so much more. They also have several apartment buildings for independent living for the mentally ill.
    One-fourth of the inmates in Arizona prisons are on some type of psychotropic medication and/or are diagnosed with a serious mental illness. Most of the crimes they commit are because they’re not being treated for their condition.
    There are about 4200 mentally ill homeless people in Arizona.
    Mental illness affects one in five families.
    Mental illness is more common than heart disease, diabetes, and cancer. It is not a result of being weak and willpower will not make it go away. It is a life-long illness that needs to be treated for life.
    Happy Giving Tuesday – I’ve ranted long enough about mental illness!

    Like

    • Joelle Casteel says:

      So good of you to mention mental illness and helps, Holla. Without my Master’s support, I’m not sure where I’d be- I’m bipolar 1 with rapid cycling and OCD tendencies. I’ll have to check out that look and see about places in Michigan. I admit, I’m picky about supporting mental health groups because I find too often a focus on chemical medicines for treatment and a lack of respect for other methods of treatment.

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      • ameliahfaith says:

        Joelle, you are so very brave to share your diagnosis. I am bipolar as well as having 2 forms of depression, ODC, PTSD, etc, etc. It is because of people like you and Holla that others can be more comfortable sharing their illnesses. Maybe someday it will not be something to be ashamed of.

        Holla, my daughter was hospitalized when she was 12 for depression and possible bi-polar/schizophrenia. I know how had that was for you. I am so glad you found the support and help you needed!!

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        • Joelle Casteel says:

          thanks, Ameliah. I think that mental illness is one of those things that we just have to talk about to lessen stigma. To get people to be able to access help.

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    • AFOdom says:

      Mental illness takes a huge toll both on the people with the illness as well as with their friends and families. I’ve sometimes said I’m not sure which of those it’s harder on — and I suspect it varies from day to day. Watching someone you love deal with something you may be powerless to help with is debilitating in its own way.

      I’ve also referred to mental illnesses as “invisible illnesses”. It’s so easy for people to dismiss them, because the illnesses can’t be seen. And while people who have them must deal with them every day, when they are doing well (are in “remission”), others can forget the impact of the daily struggle.

      I’ll keep checking back on the Toby House website – I’m very interested to see what they offer, based on your description.

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    • Renee says:

      Mental illness is one very overlooked or ignored problem today. My oldest daughter is bipolar and it is very difficult. Of course she would be the only child who moved 12 hours away, everyone else stayed close to home. Anyway, yes mental illness can be an invisible illness that needs to be brought to the light. Thanks for opening the doors.

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  7. Joelle Casteel says:

    I know you mentioned links, but I feel funny at the idea- both the spirit of your calender and the fact that both of mine would be denomination specific. In the stress of this past year with my Master out of work, us living on savings, my ex failing to pay child support, the places I want to support after He gets His next paycheck are the Church of the Larger Fellowship (the online UU church that’s my church) and Unitarian Universalist Service Committee. I wish I hadn’t been so sick, so depressed, so self-centered that I only caught a bit of the “Something Good” excitement. That’ll be great to read his interview later this month.

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    • Joelle Casteel says:

      I just wanted to add how inspiring the pictures of the Kindles are 🙂 I had to check the link ’cause my Ana’s Advent Calender button in my margin wasn’t working. Goodness, the comments so far 🙂 such wonderful sharing

      Like

    • AFOdom says:

      Joelle – I think denomination-specific charitable organizations are can be powerful places to help. I’m UU also, so I know that the UU Service Committee helps people regardless of race, class, ethnic background, sexual orientation, religious beliefs, or any other thing someone might possibly discriminate on.

      I don’t know if your online church participates in the seasonal “Guest At Your Table” movement during the holiday season, but our family has incorporated it into our regular holiday traditions. While advent wreaths aren’t a universal UU thing, my upbringing is Catholic, and I love those things. We put our GaYT donation box in the middle of our wreath, and we put a little money in it every time we sit down for dinner. We also spend some time talking about who our “Guest” might be for the night. A homeless person who can’t afford food? A family from a place where water is scarce? A person kicked out of his/her home after sharing his/her sexual orientation with parents? On Christmas Eve, we bring our donations to our church as a family, knowing he UUSC helps all our “Guests” with the money we are able to share.

      And please, please, please don’t add guilt to your list of stressors from your past year. Caring for yourself first is the best way to be able to care for others. On days when the most you can do is brush your teeth, remember that even having sweet smelling breath can be a positive thing for anyone you interact with. Including yourself. 🙂

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      • Joelle Casteel says:

        Anne- have you seen the variety of UU Advent calenders out there? Sadly I don’t think we’ve done “Guest at Your Table’ at CLF; I’m not sure how that’d work lol. Very true on UUSC helping all sorts. I’m hoping to get some Winter Holiday gifts from them.

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  8. ruthshulman says:

    I see so many people being kind to each other up there, it’s heartwarming. My favorite organizations care for those who haven’t much of a voice to ask for help: animals. The Elephant is part of my pagan spirituality, and so I donate (when I can) and spread the word (always) about elephant conservation and rescue causes. My favorite is the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust ( http://www.sheldrickwildlifetrust.org/ ). They are primarily known for rescuing orphaned elephant calves, but will take in any orphan. (Their baby giraffe is adorable, and has had a special shelter built recently as she gets taller. 🙂 ) It takes about three years for a calf to be independent of milk so the babies are with them a long time. But once they are old enough, they are sent to one of three reintroduction facilities that allow them shelter while meeting wild elephant herds and returning to Elephant Life, so to speak.

    (I see here that my lack of technology skills has made the link almost invisible. So here it is again: http://www.sheldrickwildlifetrust.org/ . If you visit the link, look at the stories of the babies. Or the videos of Maxwell, the blind rhino, who lives with them permanently and likes to get into Daphne Sheldrick’s garden. 😀 )

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  9. AFOdom says:

    Anne here – I’ve participated in Something Good in non-monetary ways so far. I’ve been sharing information with folks, trying to drum up more book donations. I’ve approached an author I don’t actually know and asked for her books specifically, because I believe the content is so close to what some of the LNF youth have or are experiencing. This was a big deal for me, because cold-contact makes my hands sweat. I’ve also been helping Ana with data entry for tracking all the books on the Kindles. This is not a big deal for me, because data entry is really a zen and relaxing thing, I find. In this way, I may be considered odd. 🙂

    I am extremely passionate about sex education for all ages. I have taught comprehensive Sex Ed at my church for 3+ years. While I can no longer teach that 9 month course for 7th-9th grade (due to medical issues that impede commitment), I take every opportunity to educate anyone who will listen about healthy sexual development and relationships at all stages of life. First and foremost, I educate my children, partly because I want them to have healthy sex lives and relationships, but also because every educated child can educate their peers. This snowball effect can create a growing sex-positive environment for more and more people.

    Dan Savage is one of my biggest inspirations for sexual education. Most people have heard of his “It Gets Better” project, but if you haven’t, here’s a link: http://www.itgetsbetter.org/

    If you’ve never listened to a Savage Love podcast, I highly recommend them. You are bound to learn things about sex and sex-positivity that you’ve never heard before. 🙂

    Like

    • Amy says:

      Oh, that’s awesome. I’m big on comprehensive sex ed. My own education was severely lacking. I’m trying to do better with my own kids, since I know they’re not going to get what they need in school. Of course, the “down” side to that (it isn’t really a down side; I’m joking) is having my kids ask me questions that floor me. I have to not react and just answer them…like the time my son asked me about gay sex in the car one day. Then again, I get my proud mom moments too–like when my daughter’s friend told her 2 girls can’t get married and my daughter (who was 5 at the time) replied, “Yes, they can–it’s the law!” Or when my son “educated” his peers on the bus about what it means to be trans (they apparently have a genderqueer classmate). He said the other kids just stared at him, totally not getting it, but they backed off and stopped bullying the kid. He was so proud of himself he cried (he’s very sensitive). Here’s to sex+!

      Like

    • ameliahfaith says:

      Anne,
      That’s great! I am a firm believer in sex ed for all ages. Knowledge is power and power is safety! And to have a church that supports this leaves me dumbfounded and joyous at the same time! Thank you for your efforts!

      Amy,
      How awesome are you that your kids an handle heavy issues like gay marriage and transgender kids. Way to knock it out of the park mom!!

      Like

  10. Leigh Smith says:

    Wonderful thing you’re doing and the work of Something Good is amazing. Sorry to say since I retired, i don’t do any volunteer work any more and my only contributions are financial, and not very big at that, but if I sell more books, that would change.

    Congratulations, Renee

    Like

    • AFOdom says:

      I say no apologies for how you are able to contribute to anything. I once heard a woman talk about “seasons of life”. She said that it’s important to accept what you can do in each season and recognize that what you have been or will be able to do in another season is just a holistic part of how you share your whole life.

      When I had kids, I had to give up volunteer work for a long time. I had to remind myself that the season of my life before kids had made a big difference to so many people. The season of my life with children might mean the only way I contribute is by raising responsible children who also bring light to the world. While it at first seemed “lesser” to me than my previous direct donations of time and money, I learned to accept that my parenting was a strong contribution that fit that season of my life.

      Seeing my whole life as an ebb and flow of giving to others in a holistic way has helped me realize every contribution I can make at any time is valuable, no matter how grand or how simple. So celebrate what you are able to do in this season of your life, knowing that this may be the time for you to allow other folks in other seasons to take the baton of volunteerism from your hand.

      Like

  11. Sarah Bennett says:

    Good morning, all 🙂
    I’m honored to be a monetary contributor and part of Something Good. It is beautiful to see the project blossom and know I played a small part.
    My desire to help stems from my personal journey as a gay woman coming out later in life. I am just beginning to understand my own heart and mind. I hope the kids at LNF can find their answers much sooner and know that they’re loved by many. I feel very misunderstood and unaccepted by my own biological family and hope these lgbt youth can rise above their own challenges. May they find their strength in these gifts.
    Reading and education is power and provides avenues of growth.
    I can’t wait to see where God takes the project!!

    Like

    • ameliahfaith says:

      That was beautiful Sarah. You may be late to the party but you have found your place quickly and have grown so much and gained so much confidence. You have not only found your place but also your heart. I am so grateful to call you friend.

      Like

  12. Amy says:

    Wow! All these great organizations. The big one I support is Girl Scouts USA. My daughter is a scout, and they have a written non-descrimination policy regarding race, religion, disability, sexual orientation, and gender identity. Trans girls are welcome in Girl Scouts, and many girls and leaders are out as bi and lesbian. So not specifically a LGBTQ org, but definitely LGBTQ-friendly. I’m proud to have been a scout for 9 years myself, and this is my 5th year as a parent. 🙂

    We also give to the National Hemophilia Foundation. My husband’s younger brother passed away in 2007 due to complications of hemophilia and HIV (the meds for HIV are brutal for those with blood disorders–they can cause strokes, especially in people like my BIL, who had the most severe form of hemophilia). So we honor his name by continuing to support research and treatment. https://www.hemophilia.org/

    Like

  13. sassytwatter says:

    Thord Tinebo The charm hoppfully I’m typing as I have a giggle baby squirming in my arms. Have loved reading everyone comments and seeing all the good on this thankful Tuesday. Ana it’s truly amazing what you did the kindles are an amazing gift for so many reasons and that you were able to get such wife spread support through social media. We support Laura’s Hiuse it’s a shelter for abused women and chikdren it is down the street from us and we volunteer time and I help plan a yearly fundraiser. Ok baby getting to wiggly. Wishing everyone a happy dev 2

    Like

    • chickie says:

      This made me giggle and took a couple tries to read lol. Totally understand trying to do things while wiggly squirmy grabby is on your lap.

      So spell check on my new phone hasn’t learned my mistyping style yet so it says nutty things. Best one is when I try to type I’m or I am, it becomes s&m. I’ve written lots of dirty stuff, but never that phrase so no clue where it came from unless it came preloaded with some read your mind app!

      Like

  14. ameliahfaith says:

    Hi,
    The only thing I have done for Something Good is to repost Ana’s posts about it to make everyone who views my page aware too. Some people have shared the links so hopefully something good will come of it. Oh, I truly did not do that on purpose!!

    I know there are lots of people in need out there but I am far more concerned with wildlife and nature. I support the Minnesota Wildlife Rehabilitation Center.

    http://www.wrcmn.org/ The Wildlife Rehabilitation Center of Minnesota (WRC) in Roseville, Minn., is a nonprofit, donor-supported organization. The WRC was established in response to the increased need for medical care of injured, ill and orphaned wildlife. With a medical staff of 8, the Center is one of the largest and busiest wildlife medical centers in the nation. More than 400 volunteers care for, rehabilitate and release the wildlife that they’ve worked with. The WRC treats more than 8,500 wild animals every year, representing more than 160 different species. Watch our Facebook page or register for our emails to keep up to date with WRC.

    Like

  15. ameliahfaith says:

    If there is anything you are passionate about and you can not give money, give yourself! Volunteer!! Maybe your favourite charity is huge like World Wildlife Fund, well then start local, local is part of worldwide. Make toys for animals at shelters or rescues. Help out at a place, shelters need people to work with the animals and take care of them. Hospitals always need volunteers for a variety of things. Find an abandon lot or just anyplace polluted and clean it up. Be a foster to a kid or critter LOTS of breed specific dog rescues need help so you can pick your favourite kind and kitties need help too. Volunteer at a homeless shelter or soup kitchen. Plant trees, recycle, buy from places like Goodwill. The list is as limitless as your imagination!

    Like

  16. nancygoldberglevine says:

    Ana, Something Good is such a great cause and I love the idea of GIving Tuesday. I have several causes I’m passionate about. In 2001, my husband passed away at the age of 46. He had lung cancer, and had never smoked. Recently, I heard the story of Lauren Hill, who has an inoperable brain tumor–she’s 19, and she wanted to play in her first basketball game before she died. She did! Here’s the link for The Cure Starts Now.
    http://www.thecurestartsnow.org/

    Like

    • nancygoldberglevine says:

      Cancer Family Care is another organization that was a huge help to me while my husband was sick and after he passed away. The have counseling and support groups, a library, and a memorial service I went to with my parents that was wonderful. I really love this Giving Tuesday idea because every year at work we have a fund raiser and there are a huge amount of charities you can give to but this year we’re laid off and I miss participating.
      Here’s the link for Cancer Family Care.
      http://cancerfamilycare.org/

      Like

  17. Lara Estes says:

    Okay this may sound a bit lame but I donate to the Good Will both in cash donations and clothing/household goods. Another organization is in my home town, Hastings Family Service. It is a local charity organization helping local individuals and families that are need of food and or clothing. They also help to pay utilities during the winter months. This is embarrassing but there was a time I needed help form them. It is very humbling. I can fully understand how people feel how need this type of assistance. I has away of beating you down, you wish you didn’t have to be there that you could support your family. Lastly NOH8, I guess most won’t see this as a charity but I strongly support their effort to bring an end to bulling.

    Like

    • ameliahfaith says:

      Lara,
      It is not lame at all!! We give clothing/household items as well as buy goods from them. M is addicted to their web site auction! (We have gotten some AMAZING beyond belief good deals!) Half my house decorations come from GW.

      I too understand needing a hand in life. Nothing wrong with that even though it is very humbling. I am glad you got the help. It is wonderful that you can give back. Thank you!

      Like

    • Shannon Love says:

      Hi Lara!
      Absolutely nothing lame about it!!! You were so blessed to get help when you needed it. Sadly, not everyone has access and they go without. And now you’re in a position to give back. I’m also happy you’re here so we all can meet you and share your experience. I have found that it’s easier for me to give help than allow myself to receive help. It breaks my heart (in sort of a good way at times) that my 9 year old son runs to my side to help me walk when my leg gives out suddenly. I have Lupus and while my disease state is very mild for the most part, there are times I have a hard time with joint pain. I’m suppose to be the one doing the supporting. 🙂

      Like

    • Renee says:

      Lara there is nothing lame about the Good will organization. It provides so much good to the local community in need. I am sure that most of us at some point or another needed help. I know I did, more than once. I love the on NOH8 concept. I work with kids daily to promote no bullying and teaching positive ways of dealing with diversity. It is an important thing to get across to the next generation.

      Like

  18. nancygoldberglevine says:

    I also support the Alzheimer’s Association http://www.alz.org/
    Two years ago tomorrow, my friend and I found my parents on the floor of the home where they’d lived for almost sixty years (more about this later on my blog), sick and dehydrated. They went to the hospital, then a nursing home for rehab and had to move into the nursing home permanently. We found out my mom was in the early stages of dementia. One thing I would do, though, if I had a lot of money (which I definitely don’t right now) is start a charity for only children who need help when things like this happen. I had help from my friends, the nursing home, etc., but basically everything was on my shoulders and it’s a lot to do by myself, especially since my parents and I had been so close over the years.

    Like

  19. laurellasky says:

    I’m retired and due to illness and taking care of my darling Ed I stopped my 18 years as a volunteer Captain of the Delray Beach Police Dept. Ed and I are now involved with the Alzheimer’s Research and Treatment Center. This wonderful place has been helping Ed and myself to try and prevent Ed from regressing, and so far he is doing well, as he will be 90 years old.
    We also help our local shelter for abused women by donating clothing and small donations.
    If I win the lottery (I guess it would help to buy a ticket) I would be able to do more.

    Like

    • Barbara McCormick says:

      Yeah, I understand about buying a ticket! I’ve considered doing the same thing to pay for my medical stuff. I’m happy you’re working with the Center and so sorry you’re dealing with Alzheimer’s.

      Like

  20. P.T. Wyant says:

    Last year a friend organized a knitting/crocheting project to make squares to make blankets for homeless LGBT youth in Pittsburgh and I crocheted for that. I want to do it again this year but can’t remember the organization. (Stress is eating holes in my brain.) I’ll have to snag her on FB tomorrow and ask her. (I should be on my way to work right now…)

    Also, the domestic violence shelter in my hometown runs a second hand shop and it’s become my favorite store.

    I’m also very interested/involved in literacy programs.

    I’m sure there’s more and I’ll try to post again when I get home from work tonight if I can think of them.

    Like

  21. Renee says:

    I am amazed at the number of organizations mentioned just in this blog post. I know there are many new ones for me to investigate. I don’t do as much as I used to but I run a school that reaches children who are often lost in the typical system. We are focused locally and often run drives for local homeless shelters and we raise funds each year for the local leukemia foundation that focuses on children with cancer. I feel that involving our children from a young age teaches them to appreciate diversity and that outreach is important.

    Ana, thank you for the gift, I am so excited to win something the first day. And I love the graphics at the top of your blog. I will email you my address.

    Blessings,
    Renee

    Like

  22. chickie says:

    One thing that really bothers me is animal abuse and neglect. There’s tons of organizations and plenty of people that deal with pets, so I don’t worry too much about them. I focus my work on horses because I rehab and train, but have taken in a few goats and ducks. The laws for livestock protection are very weak and people can do horrid things and get away with them because it’s “just” a farm animal. I am involved with a case right now where she starved three horses to death, two more had to be euthanized, and three more were on their last leg who are now are doing fantastic. She was slapped with three misdemeanors and if her case ever gets heard will have fines less than $500. Imagine what would’ve happened if those were dogs… And I was requested to come help remove three horses from another property tonight. I can’t house them, so someone else is taking this case. It just never ends. Some people don’t realize the cheapest part about buying an animal is buying the animal. That applies to everything from a hamster on up to (I assume) an elephant.

    Like

    • Barbara McCormick says:

      Bless you, Chickie!! We have a couple of horse rescues in our state, but there’s never enough people or money to provide what they need. My state is better than most, simply because people move here and start non-profits a lot. We live with rescued domestic rabbits and have fostered several over the years. You’re right; people treat animals at least as badly as they do other people. Thanks to people like you who take action!

      Like

      • chickie says:

        Bunnies… sends chills up my spine! I brought in a house bunny that had been attacked by a dog. He was in shock and I knew he wouldn’t survive the night, so I brought him out of the cold rain so he could die with as much dignity as he could. I couldn’t find an overnight emergency clinic that would euthanize him. Little $#@& not only survived the night, he also bonded with my husband and they became inseparable. He even followed him into the bathroom! But, he attacked me any chance he got, hiding behind furniture to jump out and slash me. And spray me. Oh, and it turned out I was highly allergic to bunnies. 3 long years later… we are bunny-free!

        I’m sure your rabbits are absolutley darling though, and very lucky to have a great home. I was really surprised by the amount of interaction and care they truly need.

        Like

    • SH says:

      Chickie, I volunteer time at a horse sanctuary which happens to be where I board my mare. Thank you for what you do for such a proud, majestic, and trusting animal!

      Like

      • Chickie says:

        Fun! I volunteered at a therapeutic riding center for years. They had an incredible trainer and I could get a free lesson in exchange for 10 hours of work. I helped people and she helped me achieve my goals. They were the “yeah right” kind of goals and I did it! Perfect example of how giving yourself always pays back so much greater in the end.

        Like

  23. ruthshulman says:

    chickie… we definitely need more animal-friendly laws out there. Farm animals are easily obtainable; keeping an elephant does at least require a permit from the USDA (if you are above-board). I wish there were more requirements for health-and-welfare monitoring of all large animals. 🙂

    Like

  24. pieclown says:

    Hi, I am a professional clown. We get ask to volunteer and walks all the time. I so several a year and Christian clowning. I also go to the local hospital 11 months a year(not Dec-every goes then) and a Ronald McDonald House. One walk that is close to my heart is the Alzheimer Walk. I did 3 walks this year. My aunt passed from this close to 20 years ago. I worked in the senior living centers and have met and lost friends to this.

    Like

  25. Barbara McCormick says:

    Wow! So much generosity and love here today! Ana, I have followed your creation of Something Good with awe and admiration this year. It takes a very special, committed person to create a charity, get it up on its wobbly legs, and actually produce results in as short a time as you have managed. Good on you!! I will definitely give to Something Good when our finances improve. Which they are, finally!

    Joelle and Holla, you really touch my heart. A dear friend of mine’s son lives with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Her family’s struggles to come to terms with mental disorder has been horrific. Dad was unwilling to accept his child’s diagnosis; healthy brother was embarrassed by it; Mom was working to pay the bills and trying to hold it all together. In the midst of it, of course, this young man was trying to please everyone while his mind and body were betraying him. What a difficult situation! I wish there was more I could do for all of them and you! Know that you’re loved and appreciated; your openness about this is so brave and so generous!

    As for what I give, this past year and a half has been tough. I’ve been addressing health issues, mostly caused by a moment of extreme klutziness. Between exercising my leg, going to physical therapy, and trying to make enough money to pay for it all, my time and money have been swallowed up! I give to children’s causes, particularly those involving literacy, when I can. In the past, I’ve also supported adult literacy programs. Just being able to read can make such an amazing difference for people! As I get my editing business up and running, I hope to be able to contribute more in this area. I also shop at lot at Goodwill and a local charity called ARC for materials for my artwork. Most of my blue jeans also come from there! We have been clearing out our overcrowded garage and donating whatever has not passed into the trash stage of life. We donate quite a lot to a local center, Jefferson County Action Center, which provides people in need with rent money, food, personal care items, wheelchairs, clothing, and anything else they can. I once needed their services and we donate there out of personal gratitude. There’s really no shame in asking for help when you need it, although it’s also the most difficult time to ask!

    Love you all and love this warm, loving, generous community!

    Like

  26. Sarah says:

    Hi, I support an organisation called Angels for the Forgotten. This is an organisation supporting children entering and especially leaving the foster care system. They provide household goods, food and support to live independently. They also assist women and children fleeing domestic abuse by providing care packs. They are nondenominational, nonjudgmental and run a foodbank as well.
    I participated in The 15 Can Challenge this year and that was fun and provided me with a purpose when life wasn’t all that fun. I am working on improving my knitting skills and learning to crochet so that I can donates blankets for their winter challenge- socks, soup and blankets. Hope everyone has a good day, Sarah Byrnes.

    Like

  27. Katy Beth McKee says:

    Well we’ve been on the receiving end the last few years. My kids are involved in Camp Fire which is co-ed. The last several years they have gotten my kids scholarships for all or part for the things they want to do. So I try to volunteer and help out when they need it. Camp Fire is an inclusive organization and at least our local group teach leadership and service to teens. Working through Camp Fire my #3 child wracked up 1600 community service hours. The younger two are working on wracking up their own set of hours.

    Also, I love the post about the Kindles. Despite where we live, worship, and I work my 2nd son has never had to worry about being loved and accepted since he came out a few years ago. My heart goes out to any young person who made to feel less for any reason but especially because of gblt issues.

    Like

  28. Charmaine Butler says:

    I am not an author so I didn’t donate but who knows what the future holds maybe one day I can.

    My usual charity is a very local based Cancer group who works all year around on fund raising. We have some great events each year. But this yea My family has had trouble with mental illness and my sister has been really ill these past few months and while in hospital it’s made me realise that it takes it toll on families too. Although I’m fine I spend at least 2 days a week away from my young son to help my sister, not that I moaning just making a point. Caring for a loved one is hard. A lot harder than I first thought and I’m trying to find out if there are any charities based in the area to help out and see what I can do not just for the ones that are ill but also their families. I don’t have a lot of money. I struggle to put food on the table half the time so I donate my time and energy.

    Like

  29. Kyra says:

    I love what you and the other authors have done with Something Good. It’s sad that almost half of the homeless teens young adults are from the LGBT community. It’s sad that there are any homeless I especially out there. Children and family are meant to be less bed, no matter their race or sexual orientation. Kudos to you and all those who have donated.

    The charities I donate to are any that rescue and preserve the rights of animals . Animals and children are the most innocent of all beings, yet the ones most likely to be abused. I densest abuse of any kind, especially to animals, children and the elderly.
    I have three fur baby cats ( all rescues) and am in the process of adopting a fur baby dog. They are loyal and loving….you can always count on them.

    Hello Hills, Renee. Sarah I love the objective of Angels for the Forgotten. It’s heart wrenching when kids who have grown up in a foster or group home suddenly at 18 have to be on their own, without a safety net. It makes me even more thankful for my family an blessings.
    I applaud that organization!!

    Like

  30. Shannon Love says:

    I always donate to the Cancer Society and the Heart and Stroke Foundation (in Canada). I support SickKids Hospital (in Toronto) because both of my sons have needed surgery there and the whole hospital is amazing.
    I read the posts from last year and while I buy food for the food basket at my kids’ school, I will now be asking the school nurse if there are gifts/food that I can pass on to any kids in need. I never would have thought of that.
    I am truly inspired by Ana’s hard work with Something Good. It just shows that one person can start with a tiny ripple and turn it into a tidal wave. Amazing!!

    Like

  31. JC says:

    It is wonderful what a giving spirit is among this group of people. Because of my church I am involved in several outreach ministries. My favorite of which is the time that I get to spend getting in the ladies prison and leading Bible studies at the juvenile detention center as well as our local county jail.
    While it is not a monetary donation I love getting to spend time with these ladies who are going through a tough time. It is a blessing to be able to encourage them and answer questions they have.

    Like

  32. catrouble says:

    Wow…lots of messages here and I don’t have time to go through all of them…will have to come back at a later date to review them. I am sure that just as last year, everyone has many wonderful ideas of places to start giving.

    I was fortunate enough to be able to donate a bit of money for the Kindles and some time for “Something Good”…just wish it could have been more.

    It has been and continues to be a pet peeve of mine that many people give in the spirit of Christmas but not any other time of year…grocery stores do have barrels for canned and dry goods year round but they are not front and center as they are during the holidays…as if no one is hungry except at Christmas. Did you know that many of the food pantries run out of food and have to turn people away during the summer months? In addition, most of the food banks run out of food towards the end of the month when social security checks, food stamps, limited income run out. Each week when you go shopping, place a few canned or boxed items in your cart…if you store doesn’t have a collection bin, you can always drive by your local food pantry or Salvation Army and drop them off.

    Many of my mom’s friends don’t know a lot about computers but are on fixed incomes. So if something goes wrong with their computers or they have questions, it can be quite a financial hit if they have to pay for “service”. My mom started telling some of her friends that I was a computer “guru” *cough” *choke* *snicker* and giving them my phone number…she knew I would not turn them away…love you mom! Then they started telling others…so now I have about 60 ‘seniors’ that I provide ‘tech support’ to. LOL

    One of my favorite places to volunteer is at our local animal shelter…they always need someone to clean out litter boxes and cages…not a fun job but needs to be done! They also need people to keep the animals, especially cats, socialized and of course, dogs and cats need to be brushed and played with. If you don’t have pets, this is a great way to introduce your children to the amount of work pets require. Even if you can only volunteer one day a month, that’s one more day of help than they have right now. If you can afford it, they also need food (usually dry), litter, toys, carriers, office supplies and cleaning supplies. You might also be able to donate old towels and blankets that are ripped, worn or torn…but ask if they can use these first.

    Thank you Ana for all that you do…your loving spirit and generosity of heart is a shining example for all of us.

    Hugs and Blessings…
    Cat

    PS…One thing I do suggest…before you donate to any charity, check and see how much of your donation goes towards actually helping people…check and see how much the CEO earns and what perks they receive. For example, I received an email stating that Goodwill CEO and owner Mark Curran profits $2.3 million a year. You donate to his business and then he sells the items for PROFIT. He pays nothing for his products and pays his workers minimum wage!. Supposedly, $0.00 goes to help anyone! I am still researching to see if this is true but if I find out it is, this man will not receive one thing from me in the future.

    Like

    • Shannon Love says:

      Hi Catrouble!
      I love that you’re “tech support” for seniors!!! I was just picturing it and realized that there is a real need for that. My grandma didn’t even want to try computers. She just decided that she wouldn’t even know how to turn one on. I thought she would have enjoyed it if she would have given it a chance. When a computer goes wrong, I don’t realize there are steps that I automatically do to fix it on my own. I’m lucky, I’ve been trained by my husband who’s a robotics engineer and used to build computers when he was in high school.
      I’m sure you’re giving a lot better service than what they were paying for. A lot of tech people over the phone (or in person) aren’t very kind. I had a tech guy get short with me at work yesterday and I know computers. You’re doing a lot more than just fixing troublesome computers.
      I’m sure you’ve heard some amazing stories from those seniors. They have the best!!!

      Like

      • catrouble says:

        LOL Shannon…some of them having amazing stories and I have encouraged them to ‘write’ type their stories for the kids/grands so their stories aren’t lost.

        One of the things I find very rewarding is that many of these seniors love to correspond and due to shaky handwriting, vision issues, etc., they have been limited to short notes and/or phone calls…which can’t always last as long. One man’s handwriting was so bad that his letters had been returned to him as undeliverable…he had used return address stickers. By teaching them how to use the computer, they can again correspond with their friends and family as they have always enjoyed. I have had some, including that one man, who burst into tears when they realize that they can type their letter and envelope to mail and reconnect…makes me cry also! Blessings…Cat

        Like

        • Shannon Love says:

          Wow. What seems like no big deal to us or something we take for granted, computer/internet really opens life up for people who would be completely isolated from friends and family. This is a huge deal.

          Like

    • Chickie says:

      Cat, I just had to jump in to defend goodwill. The executives do make a lot of money. While I don’t agree with the actual dollar amount, all top level executives in the organizations I looked into make similar salaries or even more. It’s a tremendous amount of work and talent that goes into running those sorts of things, and the high salaries are important to retain them so they don’t run off to another company.

      I am personally involved with the GOOD of goodwill through my church. There is a massive amount of money spent by goodwill to provide not only financial assistance but also job training, especially computer skills. They hire people to work in stores who are typically not very employable. My churchs affiliated store has a large proportion of staff with clear learning or developmental disabilities. They are learning skills and being productive and earning some money. The items sold are sold for money, like any thrift store, and all proceeds are routed back into the people. Yes, it does go towards paying executives but it also goes to lots of other amazing things. Also, they take the clothes that can’t be sold, usually due to excessive staining or a hole in the knee, and re-donate those items directly to our local shelters. The clothing that isn’t usable in any way gets recycled. All of this requires a great deal of sorting, which provides employment for people without the skills to work on the floor. My store has a profoundly autistic man that truly enjoys what he does. I joke that I need to bring him home to do my laundry 🙂

      Like

    • Chickie says:

      Also, about the minimum wage part, that’s true and many salaries are supplemented with funding due to the employees disabilities. However, many of them need very close supervision and low management to employee ratios to keep them focused. I’ve also seen many instances where they came in and dont feel like working, sometimes they’ve got to transport them back to their home. tbis isn’t the case with everybody, and there’s plenty of able bodied employees and volunteers on staff. From what I’ve seen, everybody is delighted to have employment with benefits.

      Like

      • catrouble says:

        Thanks for setting the record straight Chickie…as I said…I had just received an email with the information regarding some of the charitable foundations and I hadn’t had time to investigate. Goodwill was one example and I just wanted everyone to be clear about who and what they are donating to. So happy to hear that the information was wrong as I have donated quite a bit of clothing and toys over the years. 😉 Thank you again!

        Hugs and Blessings…
        Cat

        Like

        • Chickie says:

          There was a fiasco at church where a bunch wanted us to stop affiliating with them because of info similar to what you’d gotten. I learned an awful lot about the organization that way!

          Like

    • Anastasia Vitsky says:

      Cat, the email you received is a very old urban myth. It started in 2005 and keeps circulating, despite being proven wrong. I always check information on Snopes first:

      “Goodwill: Goodwill Industries International is not a business that takes in donated items and resells them for a profit. It is a not-for-profit organization that provides job training, employment placement services and other community-based programs for people who have disabilities, lack education or job experience, or face employment challenges. Goodwill raises money for their programs through a chain of thrift stores which also operate as non-profits.

      The CEO of Goodwill Industries International is not Mark Curran, nor does he make $2.3 million a year. The current President and CEO of Goodwill is Jim Gibbons, who in 2011 received a total reported compensation of $725,000.
      Read more at http://www.snopes.com/politics/business/charities.asp#qLjqeAyVQJ4Di1ZT.99

      Like

  33. SH says:

    What a wonderful day! I just love reading everyone’s comments! I have always volunteered at my children’s school, youth sports and then high school sports. I curently donate monetarily to Easter Seals because of the support and advocacy they offer to disabled and the elderly. I am the proud mother of an exceptional daughter who happens to have Down Syndrome. I know how fortunate she is to have loving support from her family, but I also know there are people who are completely alone.

    Like

  34. Julie says:

    There are so many wonderful ideas – it’s inspiring. I do hope that, especially at this time of year, people will think of food, and kids.

    The number of adults and children who are chronically hungry is always depressing and appalling, but more so at this time of year when most of us are finding ways to elaborately prepare and (over)eat one meal that could feed a family for a week. Food banks always need donations – it’s a quick, easy, cheap-if-you-want-it-to-be way to make a difference.

    And there are countless ways to help kids – most of which you know. They’re all worthy. But I encourage everyone to find a way to get personally involved. Every year I volunteer at a dinner for special needs kids. It’s not much – just a few hours out of my life. And while giving coats, money, and food are all wonderful – it makes us feel good to do that, and it should – a hug from a young girl with Down Syndrome who’s had a special night and is just happy that you’re there will change your life.

    Like

  35. michellewillms2013 says:

    Since I’m no longer able to work and continue to fight (five years now) for disability, we’re struggling on one income. So, we have no funds to contribute. I do, however, have tons of clothing. I go through my business clothes as I can (which isn’t as often as I’d like) and through my children’s clothes and donate these things to local charities. My clothes are very nice, but I won’t be needing that type of attire again, and certainly not in the amount I have. My children also outgrow things they’ve never worn (they no longer get new things as they once did). All these clothes go to one of three charities.

    Like

  36. Laura says:

    Hi everyone. I have Crohn’s so their foundation is big with me. My daughter had JRA(in remission) so that get attention too. There are so many wonderful organizations mentioned here that I never knew anything about. So thank you to everyone for your time, funds, talent and caring to those in need.

    Like

  37. Minelle says:

    So many wonderful charities. I truly believe there is so much good in the world. Look at all the wonderful giving here!
    I try and help on a personal individual basis when I am able. Some of the charities have special meaning to me such as….Ups For Downs, MS and The Alzheimer Foundation. If their is a walk or an event I try and participate. At my school we have many needy children, so when I am able I contribute by giving used clothing or foodstuffs…

    Like

  38. Marybeth says:

    Wow, what a giving community. I used to volunteer with my children’s schools. Unfortunately (fortunately?)we have moved past that now. I like to adopt children from the angel tree each year. It’s fun to shop for the toys they want. I also like to donate to animal rescue groups. All four of our dogs were rescued and I can’t imagine life without them!

    Like

  39. Katie says:

    Gosh- such great things going on all around us in this community!! And I think that the project that you are doing, Ana is a really great thing! I have not donated yet, but spoke to you recently about doing so and moving forward with that in the near future.

    I have done a bunch of things over the years. And I encourage my kids to give of themselves as well. I think that it is an important part of living a good life. It makes others feel good, and makes you feel good as well. 🙂

    Rob and I have had quite the year in so many ways. Two things have been up close and personal to us, and have my attention. One is teens/young adults who suffer from addiction and fight to stay clean. Many end up in sober houses, where great work is done as they are helped to do all the stuff that is important- attend meetings, hold jobs, give of themselves to their community and continue on with their education. I did not know that such things existed. There may be some near you. Perhaps there is a way to help there. Not all kids have the support from their families that our son has. They need volunteers and mentors.

    The other is our elderly in nursing homes. Did you know that in some states, there is no worker to patient ratio there. I have had quite a look at what goes on and I can tell you that they need volunteers to step in and visit. To spend time because the family cannot always be present. I have met so many that have no one visiting for days. Just a smile and stopping to talk can make such a difference. I go visit Dad, but I also take the time to interact with a lot of the others there. Just a minute can bring some joy! The workers are often in “get er done” mode. The residents need so much more. We will all be there one day. Things need to change!

    Like

  40. bleigh1130 says:

    Hello everyone,… I’m Brandi & i’m new to the Advent Calendar. =)

    What a great post! Glad that you could raise all the money & get those kindles to donate. =) Last month I raised $1000 for the Brain Aneurysm Foundation. At first it was hard & I didnt think i’d be able to reach the goal, but then at the last day I had some kind hearted ppl that came through & donated. Not gonna lie, I cried lol. In previous years i’ve donated to the American Cancer Society in honor of my older brother whom lost his life to cancer when he was 26yrs old.

    Like

  41. laurellasky says:

    Hi everyone, I have to jump in regarding Goodwill. I have been disabled and I had a part time job at Goodwill as a Para 2, which was a teacher asst. and sometimes substitute teacher. I worked with mentally and physically challenged teens, helping them with reading and some arithmetic. While I didn’t make a lot of money and the executives did it didn’t matter as I loved what I was doing and so did the people I worked with. These kids were amazing and it was a joyful experience. This org. gives so much to the community and people who cannot find work because of their disability are given all kinds of help at goodwill.

    It’s wonderful to see what Ana started and how it’s blossomed. All of you taking part in this are amazing. Big hugs to you all. 😍

    Like

  42. Anna V Jones says:

    It is so interesting to see what people are passionate about.

    I donated a copy of each of Witty Bard Publishing’s works to Something Good. I am so excited to be a part of something so amazing!

    I would like to do something aimed at high school, possibly junior high school, students in an effort to encourage and promote reading and writing. I am working with a High School in Washington State to create a charity anthology where the proceeds go to the high school’s creative writing club for the purchase of computers, etc. They will be judged and the winners will get published. I would like to expand that to other schools and give the students something to strive for. I can’t even imagine where I would be right now as a writer if I had had something of that nature when I was in high school.

    Like

  43. Kristin Elyon says:

    Wow! I don’t know what to say with all those amazing comments, you all are really wonderful!

    When I was younger in high school. I visited a place called the Shy Wolf. It’s a rescue center for wolves and big cats (cougars, jaguars ect.) I LOVED it and I became a volunteer there and I made so many friends. I was ‘claimed’ by a wolf and cuddled with a cougar.. and yes big cats do purr too 🙂 When I graduated I couldn’t spend as much time there and now as I’m a little older I donate to their Sanctuary as often as I can and a portion of all my book sales always goes to them. http://www.shywolfsanctuary.com/

    Like

  44. Irishey says:

    Just a late night hello. I’ve skimmed here – very good stuff! I help in individual, personalized ways, no longer to a specific group, although I often support the local school, charity drives and support groups.

    Hugs!

    Like

  45. Roz Harrison says:

    Wow, there are so many wonderful organisations mentioned here. You and everyone involved with Something Good are doing an amazing thing Ana.

    I tend to help individuals rather than organisations too. The organisations I do support are mainly animal welfare charities such as the SPCA, guide dog foundation, WISPA etc.

    Hugs
    Roz

    Like

  46. thelongbean says:

    In the past I used to raise money for a favoured local charity. The charity had two specially built boats that enabled them to take groups of people (and carers) with any disability for a day out on the local canal.
    My employer at the time would also match the money raised by one of their employees (up to $150 per “event”). In addition the charity also received grants from my employer- one of which was around $5k.
    Over the years, before I left the UK, the charity’s administrator reckoned that I and my employer had raised/donated in excess of $30k
    Nowadys, as I am effectively retired, I help in winter with a local animal charity. The cats get well fed by visitors in the summer by visiting tourists ther is no shortage of food. However, in winter the cats struggle for food and the aim it is to provide food twice a week at 15 feeding stations for the cats who do not have a home in the winter. In addition the charity has a small stock of basic vetinary products as well as arranging visits by vets (from outside the country) who undertake a neutering programme. In addition a small number of visits to a vet on another island are arranged or supported.

    Like

  47. Shannon Love says:

    I’m a really big fan of the ‘Pay It Forward’ movement that gets started. I like paying for the next order in line behind me at the drive through at Tim Hortons (or Timmies for the fellow Canadians 😀 ).
    My best friend is better at it than I am. She pays for other people’s gas at the gas station or a person’s meal at the diner. She’s heard some amazing stories from people who really needed a break.

    Like

  48. Liz Castillo (@liz_josette) says:

    For the past several of years, I have been doing what I can to support Alzheimer’s Association and raise awareness of Alzheimer’s effects to those who have it and those that take care of them. I lost my grandmother nearly two years ago from this disease and it’s been hard on all of us. Even though we are glad that she is in a better place, the lose we feel is huge. I also have two aunts who also have Alzheimer’s and one of them is close to leaving us as well. So, anything I can do to help bring an end to this disease brings hopes to those who live with it and those who care for them.
    http://www.alz.org/

    Like

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