#SatSpanks, #8Sunday, and #SnipSun: Bastia: The Early Years

WEEKEND WRITING WARRIORS

Welcome to Saturday Spankings, Rainbow Snippets, Weekend Writing Warriors, and Snippet Sunday!

Find more spanky fiction at Saturday Spankings!

What if heterophobia were real? What if, instead of religious leaders denouncing love between people of the same gender, a state theocracy decreed, “Our god commands women to marry women.”

What if loving the wrong gender could get you ostracized, imprisoned, and re-educated? In fact, you were turned over to “parents” tasked with re-programming you to live according to their definition of normal?

Yes, we are talking about conversion therapy.

That is, an attempt to “cure” a person of his or her sexual orientation, often (but not always) conducted under religious auspices.

Yes, it really does happen in our world, but it’s the opposite way around. LGBT people are told their identity is wrong, sinful, and an abomination. A perversion, a one-way ticket to damnation, and a morally wrong “choice” to be corrected with persuasion–if persecution can be classified as such.

In Becoming Clissine, I asked what would happen in a world where religious persecution of sexuality was the norm, but the roles were reversed. What if being LGBT were normal, and being heterosexual was not?

As I’ve revisited this world in more recent years, I’ve pondered how this alternate reality came to be. Why would a society choose to disenfranchise a significant portion of its population?

And then I found myself with the story of Altrea, the foremother of Bastia. Years before Bastia (as we know it in Becoming Clissine) came about, a young woman named Altrea lost her freedom and virginity to a man chosen by her father. The consequences of this one decision rippled down for generations and affected another young woman named Clissa.

This weekend’s snippet continues with the story of Terris from last week. Terris has an impressive story of her naming and birth, but near the end of her life she wonders whether the glory was worth it.

(For an audio recording of the entire second chapter, please check out this free post on my Patreon site.)

Bastia: The Early Years – Now available!

 

He told me other countries followed a star in the north, but I couldn’t believe it. How could anyone follow a northern star? We looked to the East, where Mother Sun welcomed us each morning before beginning her journey across the sky. North meant foreigners who worshipped strange gods and women who had no more rights than a child. If a wife displeased her husband, he could divorce her with a single word. If a man slept with half the tribe and fathered an army of illegitimate children, other men slapped him on the back for his “good seed.”

A wife, if she entered into the discussion, would be chided for failing to do her duty.

av-bastia-tey-200x300

What if heterosexuality were a crime?

In the world of Bastia, like must marry like. Basti, the supreme deity, has decreed so. Any deviation results in sanctions, imprisonment, torture, or even death. But how did this society come to be? How can a religion be based on hatred?

In these early chronicles of Bastia, we discover good intentions behind the benevolent theocracy gone wrong. Meet the founder of modern day Bastia, Altrea. Placed in a polygamous marriage to enrich her father, she finds love with one of her sister wives. Their husband’s reaction is swift and brutal. As Altrea struggles to make sense of the violence, she dreams of a world in which one woman can love another.

In this new perfect society called Bastia, justice reigns supreme. No one is above the law. The state will provide for all equally. But as Altrea quickly finds out, nothing is simple. Basti is love. Bastia is founded on love. So what went wrong? How did a land of idyllic happiness turn into the dystopian regime that persecutes a young woman for loving a boy?

Come and meet Karielle and Soris before they reeducate the criminal who dared to love the wrong gender, and ask yourself one question.

Why is love a crime?

Order now!

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#SatSpanks, #8Sunday, and #SnipSun: Bastia: The Early Years

WEEKEND WRITING WARRIORS

Welcome to Saturday Spankings, Rainbow Snippets, Weekend Writing Warriors, and Snippet Sunday!

Find more spanky fiction at Saturday Spankings!

What if heterophobia were real? What if, instead of religious leaders denouncing love between people of the same gender, a state theocracy decreed, “Our god commands women to marry women.”

What if loving the wrong gender could get you ostracized, imprisoned, and re-educated? In fact, you were turned over to “parents” tasked with re-programming you to live according to their definition of normal?

Yes, we are talking about conversion therapy.

That is, an attempt to “cure” a person of his or her sexual orientation, often (but not always) conducted under religious auspices.

Yes, it really does happen in our world, but it’s the opposite way around. LGBT people are told their identity is wrong, sinful, and an abomination. A perversion, a one-way ticket to damnation, and a morally wrong “choice” to be corrected with persuasion–if persecution can be classified as such.

In Becoming Clissine, I asked what would happen in a world where religious persecution of sexuality was the norm, but the roles were reversed. What if being LGBT were normal, and being heterosexual was not?

As I’ve revisited this world in more recent years, I’ve pondered how this alternate reality came to be. Why would a society choose to disenfranchise a significant portion of its population?

And then I found myself with the story of Altrea, the foremother of Bastia. Years before Bastia (as we know it in Becoming Clissine) came about, a young woman named Altrea lost her freedom and virginity to a man chosen by her father. The consequences of this one decision rippled down for generations and affected another young woman named Clissa.

This weekend’s snippet continues with the story of Terris from last week. Terris has an impressive story of her naming and birth, but near the end of her life she wonders whether the glory was worth it.

My elder brothers and sisters were named after aunts and uncles, grandparents, and esteemed ancestors.

The midwives touched their foreheads. A curse. Some women, crazed with the pain of birthing, lost their minds and delivered curses from another realm. Others feared passing madness from mother to child, and any early signs warranted an elaborate cleansing ritual from our shamans.

When Father heard the story, however, he declared I had been marked by the gods. Terris, the eastern star, shone brightly enough to guide the entire world.

(For an audio recording of the entire second chapter, please check out this free post on my Patreon site.)

Bastia: The Early Years – Now available!

av-bastia-tey-200x300

What if heterosexuality were a crime?

In the world of Bastia, like must marry like. Basti, the supreme deity, has decreed so. Any deviation results in sanctions, imprisonment, torture, or even death. But how did this society come to be? How can a religion be based on hatred?

In these early chronicles of Bastia, we discover good intentions behind the benevolent theocracy gone wrong. Meet the founder of modern day Bastia, Altrea. Placed in a polygamous marriage to enrich her father, she finds love with one of her sister wives. Their husband’s reaction is swift and brutal. As Altrea struggles to make sense of the violence, she dreams of a world in which one woman can love another.

In this new perfect society called Bastia, justice reigns supreme. No one is above the law. The state will provide for all equally. But as Altrea quickly finds out, nothing is simple. Basti is love. Bastia is founded on love. So what went wrong? How did a land of idyllic happiness turn into the dystopian regime that persecutes a young woman for loving a boy?

Come and meet Karielle and Soris before they reeducate the criminal who dared to love the wrong gender, and ask yourself one question.

Why is love a crime?

Order now!

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

#SatSpanks, #8Sunday, and #SnipSun: Bastia: The Early Years

WEEKEND WRITING WARRIORS

Welcome to Saturday Spankings, Rainbow Snippets, Weekend Writing Warriors, and Snippet Sunday!

Find more spanky fiction at Saturday Spankings!

What if heterophobia were real? What if, instead of religious leaders denouncing love between people of the same gender, a state theocracy decreed, “Our god commands women to marry women.”

What if loving the wrong gender could get you ostracized, imprisoned, and re-educated? In fact, you were turned over to “parents” tasked with re-programming you to live according to their definition of normal?

Yes, we are talking about conversion therapy.

That is, an attempt to “cure” a person of his or her sexual orientation, often (but not always) conducted under religious auspices.

Yes, it really does happen in our world, but it’s the opposite way around. LGBT people are told their identity is wrong, sinful, and an abomination. A perversion, a one-way ticket to damnation, and a morally wrong “choice” to be corrected with persuasion–if persecution can be classified as such.

In Becoming Clissine, I asked what would happen in a world where religious persecution of sexuality was the norm, but the roles were reversed. What if being LGBT were normal, and being heterosexual was not?

As I’ve revisited this world in more recent years, I’ve pondered how this alternate reality came to be. Why would a society choose to disenfranchise a significant portion of its population?

And then I found myself with the story of Altrea, the foremother of Bastia. Years before Bastia (as we know it in Becoming Clissine) came about, a young woman named Altrea lost her freedom and virginity to a man chosen by her father. The consequences of this one decision rippled down for generations and affected another young woman named Clissa.

This weekend’s snippet is from the second short story in “The Wives of Jakal” (last week’s snippet was from the first story). Terris is the second wife of Jakal, and she narrates how she came to him.

(For an audio recording of the entire second chapter, please check out this free post on my Patreon site.)

 

 In my country, Terris means star. It’s an odd name to give to the youngest daughter of a non-inheriting second princess, but my mother insisted. Strange, because she never insisted on anything.

“She will be a star,” Mother told the midwives while she labored to bring me forth. After easy births for all of her earlier children, she groaned and wept for seventeen hours. My tiny feet protruded from between her legs, and screams ripped us apart. “Fiery, all-consuming, and aloft in her own place in this world.”

Later, when the midwives bathed Mother’s forehead and laid me at her breast, she couldn’t remember her words. “Terris? We have no Terrises in our family.”

Bastia: The Early Years – Now available for pre-order!

 

av-bastia-tey-200x300

What if heterosexuality were a crime?

In the world of Bastia, like must marry like. Basti, the supreme deity, has decreed so. Any deviation results in sanctions, imprisonment, torture, or even death. But how did this society come to be? How can a religion be based on hatred?

In these early chronicles of Bastia, we discover good intentions behind the benevolent theocracy gone wrong. Meet the founder of modern day Bastia, Altrea. Placed in a polygamous marriage to enrich her father, she finds love with one of her sister wives. Their husband’s reaction is swift and brutal. As Altrea struggles to make sense of the violence, she dreams of a world in which one woman can love another.

In this new perfect society called Bastia, justice reigns supreme. No one is above the law. The state will provide for all equally. But as Altrea quickly finds out, nothing is simple. Basti is love. Bastia is founded on love. So what went wrong? How did a land of idyllic happiness turn into the dystopian regime that persecutes a young woman for loving a boy?

Come and meet Karielle and Soris before they reeducate the criminal who dared to love the wrong gender, and ask yourself one question.

Why is love a crime?

Pre-order now!

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

#SatSpanks, #8Sunday, and #SnipSun: Bastia: The Early Years

WEEKEND WRITING WARRIORS

Welcome to Saturday Spankings, Rainbow Snippets, Weekend Writing Warriors, and Snippet Sunday!

Find more spanky fiction at Saturday Spankings!

What if heterophobia were real? What if, instead of religious leaders denouncing love between people of the same gender, a state theocracy decreed, “Our god commands women to marry women.”

What if loving the wrong gender could get you ostracized, imprisoned, and re-educated? In fact, you were turned over to “parents” tasked with re-programming you to live according to their definition of normal?

Yes, we are talking about conversion therapy.

That is, an attempt to “cure” a person of his or her sexual orientation, often (but not always) conducted under religious auspices.

Yes, it really does happen in our world, but it’s the opposite way around. LGBT people are told their identity is wrong, sinful, and an abomination. A perversion, a one-way ticket to damnation, and a morally wrong “choice” to be corrected with persuasion–if persecution can be classified as such.

In Becoming Clissine, I asked what would happen in a world where religious persecution of sexuality was the norm, but the roles were reversed. What if being LGBT were normal, and being heterosexual was not?

As I’ve revisited this world in more recent years, I’ve pondered how this alternate reality came to be. Why would a society choose to disenfranchise a significant portion of its population?

And then I found myself with the story of Altrea, the foremother of Bastia. Years before Bastia (as we know it in Becoming Clissine) came about, a young woman named Altrea lost her freedom and virginity to a man chosen by her father. The consequences of this one decision rippled down for generations and affected another young woman named Clissa.

This weekend’s snippet follows last week’s introduction.

So when Jakal, a handsome newcomer, appeared and offered a herd of cattle as my bride price, Father grew thoughtful. I, the daughter of an ordinary clerk, could bring in a bride price commensurate with the daughter of a king? What fool would turn down economic security for his old age?

Father said yes.

Mother said no.

Father wouldn’t have beaten her just for saying no. Mother disagreed with anything Father said, on principle. But her “no” had no weight, either. Without his agreement, all of Mother’s marriage negotiations disappeared like dust scattered into the wind.

No, Father beat Mother for threatening to kill herself and me before she’d let “that heathen” touch me.

 Bastia: The Early Years – Coming October 20!

 

av-bastia-tey-200x300

What if heterosexuality were a crime?

In the world of Bastia, like must marry like. Basti, the supreme deity, has decreed so. Any deviation results in sanctions, imprisonment, torture, or even death. But how did this society come to be? How can a religion be based on hatred?

In these early chronicles of Bastia, we discover good intentions behind the benevolent theocracy gone wrong. Meet the founder of modern day Bastia, Altrea. Placed in a polygamous marriage to enrich her father, she finds love with one of her sister wives. Their husband’s reaction is swift and brutal. As Altrea struggles to make sense of the violence, she dreams of a world in which one woman can love another.

In this new perfect society called Bastia, justice reigns supreme. No one is above the law. The state will provide for all equally. But as Altrea quickly finds out, nothing is simple. Basti is love. Bastia is founded on love. So what went wrong? How did a land of idyllic happiness turn into the dystopian regime that persecutes a young woman for loving a boy?

Come and meet Karielle and Soris before they reeducate the criminal who dared to love the wrong gender, and ask yourself one question.

Why is love a crime?

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

#SatSpanks, #8Sunday, and #SnipSun: Bastia: The Early Years

WEEKEND WRITING WARRIORS

Welcome to Saturday Spankings, Rainbow Snippets, Weekend Writing Warriors, and Snippet Sunday!

Find more spanky fiction at Saturday Spankings!

 

What if heterophobia were real? What if, instead of religious leaders denouncing love between people of the same gender, a state theocracy decreed, “Our god commands women to marry women.”

What if loving the wrong gender could get you ostracized, imprisoned, and re-educated? In fact, you were turned over to “parents” tasked with re-programming you to live according to their definition of normal?

Yes, we are talking about conversion therapy.

That is, an attempt to “cure” a person of his or her sexual orientation, often (but not always) conducted under religious auspices.

Yes, it really does happen in our world, but it’s the opposite way around. LGBT people are told their identity is wrong, sinful, and an abomination. A perversion, a one-way ticket to damnation, and a morally wrong “choice” to be corrected with persuasion–if persecution can be classified as such.

In Becoming Clissine, I asked what would happen in a world where religious persecution of sexuality was the norm, but the roles were reversed. What if being LGBT were normal, and being heterosexual was not?

As I’ve revisited this world in more recent years, I’ve pondered how this alternate reality came to be. Why would a society choose to disenfranchise a significant portion of its population?

And then I found myself with the story of Altrea, the foremother of Bastia. Years before Bastia (as we know it in Becoming Clissine) came about, a young woman named Altrea lost her freedom and virginity to a man chosen by her father. The consequences of this one decision rippled down for generations and affected another young woman named Clissa.

Here, we meet Altrea and begin her journey.

The first time I saw my father beat my mother, I ran away. Not because he hurt her—all husbands beat their wives—but because of what he said to me.

“Basti have mercy on the poor fool who wants to marry you.”

That was the reason for the beating, you see. Mother had chosen a nephew of her neighbor as my husband-to-be. Farget was the quiet and civil sort of man who would land an advisorship to our king within ten years’ time. Mother wanted me, her only child, to live well.

For the honor of marrying into the priestly clan, Father would have to provide a dowry worth several years of his income. He had no sons requiring an inheritance, but he also had no sons to provide for his old age. There would be no arrangement with Farget.

 Bastia: The Early Years – Coming October 20!

bastia

What if heterosexuality were a crime?

In the world of Bastia, like must marry like. Basti, the supreme deity, has decreed so. Any deviation results in sanctions, imprisonment, torture, or even death. But how did this society come to be? How can a religion be based on hatred?

In these early chronicles of Bastia, we discover good intentions behind the benevolent theocracy gone wrong. Meet the founder of modern day Bastia, Altrea. Placed in a polygamous marriage to enrich her father, she finds love with one of her sister wives. Their husband’s reaction is swift and brutal. As Altrea struggles to make sense of the violence, she dreams of a world in which one woman can love another.

In this new perfect society called Bastia, justice reigns supreme. No one is above the law. The state will provide for all equally. But as Altrea quickly finds out, nothing is simple. Basti is love. Bastia is founded on love. So what went wrong? How did a land of idyllic happiness turn into the dystopian regime that persecutes a young woman for loving a boy?

Come and meet Karielle and Soris before they reeducate the criminal who dared to love the wrong gender, and ask yourself one question.

Why is love a crime?

Save

Save

Save

Save

Me, mean?: #SatSpanks and #SnipSun

Here’s an eight-sentence snippet from Kat and Natalie’s latest adventures, as part of the Saturday Spankings bloghop and Snippet Sunday. Kat’s finished making her own birthday cookies (oatmeal chocolate chip) because no one wants to eat Natalie’s cooking, and Kat gets a bit too playful with her wooden spoon. She whacks Natalie for nearly the first time in their relationship. Still, it is her birthday, so Natalie rewards Kat with a special treat–a hand spanking and reminiscing of their favorite memories. Kat doesn’t agree with Natalie’s choice, though. 🙂

(Part 1)

(Part 2)

“That one doesn’t count,” I complain, blowing the ends of my hair away from my face. After all these years, I should learn to keep a hair elastic in my pants pocket for when Natalie decides to flip me sunny side up.

“And you tried to find the school dumpster to find the hairbrush I’d so lovingly chosen for your Christmas gift,” Natalie chortles as she tugs my jeans down to my knees.

“You didn’t think it was funny at the time,” I point out. “Besides, I never would’ve lost the dumb brush if you hadn’t been so mean about it.” After a full day of frigid silence, Natalie had taken the ping-pong paddle to me twice–once for the original crime, oversleeping and missing my eight o’clock stats class, and a second time for trying to maneuver my way out of the spanking she’d threatened.

“Me, mean?” Natalie’s voice drips with false surprise as she slaps my bottom with the practiced rhythm born of years–no, decades–nestling me in her lap, patting my back as each spank awakens a delicious, forbidden tingle.

 

 

Happy birthday, Kat!: #SatSpanks, #WeWriWa, and #SnipSun

Here’s an eight-sentence snippet from Kat and Natalie’s latest adventures, as part of the Saturday Spankings bloghop, Weekend Writing Warriors, and Snippet Sunday. Kat’s finished making her own birthday cookies (oatmeal chocolate chip) because no one wants to eat Natalie’s cooking, and Kat gets a bit too playful with her wooden spoon. She whacks Natalie for nearly the first time in their relationship. Still, it is her birthday…

(background snippet from last week)

Natalie throws back her head and gives the rich, full-throated belly laugh that sends pleasurable shivers through my insides. There was a time when neither of us could find humor in anything, and we wouldn’t have dared to play. She crooks her finger, mischief glinting from her eyes as she motions for me to assume the position.

I huff in my best pouty manner, “You’re not allowed to spank me on my birthday.”

She caresses the seat of my jeans and gives a pinch. I yelp; she squeezes harder and scolds, “I told you to relax on your birthday, not make cookies.”

“Making cookies is relaxing,” I point out, and she seats herself at a chair from the kitchen table before pulling me over her lap.

“So is getting your birthday spanking,” she answers, and she begins the best gift of every year–a gentle hand spanking, each swat accompanied by retelling a favorite memory of our thirteen years together.

Please help Natalie celebrate Kat’s birthday! What is your favorite memory of their years together?

 

 

A Lunar New Year Spanking for Pao (#Satspanks, #SnippetSunday, #SeductiveSnS, and #Wewriwa)

Welcome to Saturday Spankings, Seductive Studs and Sirens, Snippet Sunday, and Weekend Writing Warriors!

Many apologies for the late posting for Saturday Spankings! This week’s snippet is a one-off thank you to Pao for her wonderful Lunar New Year post. You may want to read her post first in order to understand the first line of dialogue. 🙂

After tossing her salad into the air and enjoying fresh steamed fish, Pao held out a hand to Penny. “Gōngxǐfācái, hóngbāo nálái!”

Penny set down her own chopsticks and raised eyebrows at the girl sitting across the table, grinning from ear to ear. “Insolent brat, I told you not to give orders. Just for that, you won’t receive your red packet of money this year.”

Pao threw a chopstick, daring Penny to meet her challenge. After a moment, Penny set her napkin on the table and rose to grasp the younger girl’s left ear. Pao squeaked and tried to get away, but Penny gave a sound swat with her free hand.

“Apparently, my dear, your last spanking didn’t hurt enough.”

Extraordinary: #Satspanks, #SnippetSunday, #SeductiveSnS, and #Wewriwa

Welcome to Saturday Spankings, Seductive Studs and Sirens, Snippet Sunday, and Weekend Writing Warriors!

Mira, from Desire in Any Language, has found new love in the stunning and brilliant diplomat, Hana Takahashi. Mira adores her, even when Hana gives her provoking calls in public. Equal parts exasperated and turned on, Mira continues to reflect on the changes Hana has brought into Mira’s life.

Previous eight sentences

Previous extended preview

I never thought I would be the sort of person to say dirty things in supermarkets or proclaim my love in front of strangers. I think of myself as shy, unassuming, or even ordinary. But life with Hana has taught me even the most ordinary of events can become extraordinary. She makes me – in some ways when I’d rather not – find excitement in the everyday. With her, every day is a discovery; each meeting is an occasion.

“Why didn’t you get more apples?” Hana asks when I return home. Or, rather, to her home, the home from which we will begin our travels tonight. It’s hard to believe we will take our first trip together.

Mira’s Miracle is now available from Blushing Books! It’s not yet on Amazon, but it should be very soon. I hope you enjoyed your sneak peek. 🙂 By the way, it’s not too late to enter the two-part contest to win your very own vial of cinnamon oil. Why would you want cinnamon oil? Read Mira’s Miracle to find out!

edca_mirasmiracle

Mira’s Miracle (with Maren Smith)

Whisked away to the fairytale Castle for a dream vacation, Mira confronts her darkest fears.

 

Vacationing at Master Marshall’s world-renowned Castle should have spelled Fantasy Land, but for Mira the trip means paying a debt. She promised to work hard at her translator’s certificate course while her advisor went on maternity leave, but distraction arrives in the form of her first love. Diplomat Hana Takahashi, from Desire in Any Language, captures Mira’s total attention. Between Hana’s stringent embassy security and Mira’s draconian school dormitory curfew, their stolen kisses drive Mira wild with desire. Hana makes a bet with Mira: keep up with her schoolwork or take a trip of Hana’s choice, according to Hana’s rules. No veto power.

When Mira presents her inadequate end-of-term report, Hana books a dream vacation—of Hana’s dreams. Safe within the Castle, the elaborate role playing kink haven, Hana turns Mira into her little girl. Complete with a private nurse, playroom with its nanny in charge, and a schoolroom filled with naughty pupils and a stern teacher, the Castle’s ageplay wing reduces Mira to a child from the moment of her arrival. Hana’s word is law, and all of the Castle employees carry out her orders for Mira.

However, Mira’s natural resistance leads to tantrums, defiance, and spankings from every adult who assists with her care. When she encounters a tutor who triggers her deepest fears, she must face her residual trauma over the duplicitous “Mistress Susan.” Is Mira ready for the maternal nurturing offered by Hana, or will her unhealed wounds drive everyone away? Can she become Hana’s little girl, or will she safeword out of the Castle to return to everyday life…without Hana? Will there be a miracle for Mira?

Warning: contains ageplay, mouth-soaping, spankings, and sex scenes

Dickens Quote

Tell me the color of your panties: #Satspanks, #SnippetSunday, #SeductiveSnS, and #Wewriwa

Welcome to Saturday Spankings, Seductive Studs and Sirens, Snippet Sunday, and Weekend Writing Warriors!

My newest release, Mira’s Miracle, follows the adventures of Mira from Desire in Any Language. This week, I’ll let the sentences speak for themselves. 🙂

Mira’s Miracle sneak peek #1

Mira’s Miracle sneak peek #2

“Mira-chan,” she purrs into the small electronic earpiece for my cell phone, “tell me the color of your panties.”

The luscious red apple splurts juice as my fingernails dig into the flesh. “I’m at the supermarket!” A bent-over curly-haired woman hobbles by with a baby bundled on her back, and a loudspeaker blares with some harried employee’s voice extolling the virtues of some limited time offer promotion. Buy one get one free, or fifty percent off, or a special sample, or a cooking demonstration. I shuffle in between stacks of food. When I came to South Korea last year to enroll in a translator certification course, I knew many things would be different from my native United States. I expected the language and cultural differences, but I didn’t expect the rest.